COVID-19 chronology

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Compiled from online, newspaper and World Health Organization reports

July 3, 2020

Oregon Health Authority reported 344 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 9,636.The new cases were in the following counties: Benton (7), Clackamas (22), Clatsop (1), Columbia (3), Coos (1), Crook (1), Deschutes (9), Douglas (1), Jackson (9), Jefferson (5), Josephine (3), Klamath (2), Lake (1), Lane (16), Lincoln (18), Linn (2), Malheur (20), Marion (32), Morrow (10), Multnomah (59), Polk (5), Sherman (1), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (49), Union (8), Wasco (10), Washington (46), and Yamhill (1).

The Health Authority also released a table showing recent trends in cases by county between mid-June and the beginning of July.These trends show where the virus is spreading at the fastest rate and which counties have the highest rates of “sporadic” transmission –  cases that do not have a clear epidemiological link to other outbreaks or clusters of infections and therefore indicate that the virus is spreading uncontained in a community.

Governor Kate Brown identified eight counties that will be placed on a “Watch List” based on these data: Jefferson, Lake, Lincoln, Malheur, Morrow, Umatilla, Union, Wasco. State and local health officials will closely monitor the situation in these counties in coming days and prioritize additional resources to suppress the virus in these hotspot communities.

At 6:30 p.m. Pacific Time there were 2,890,588 cases in the United States, with 1,235,488 recoveries and 132,101 deaths. National testing reached 36,297,195. Worldwide there were 11,189,325 cases, with 6,091,301 recoveries and 529,063 deaths. Global testing reached 248,637,674.

July 2, 2020

Oregon Health Authority announced Klamath County’s death, raising state’s death toll to 209. OHA reported 375 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 9,294. The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (22), Columbia (1), Crook (1), Deschutes (9), Douglas (2), Jackson (15), Jefferson (8), Josephine (8), Lane (15), Lincoln (3), Linn (3), Malheur (16), Marion (32), Morrow (8), Multnomah (64), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (88), Union (5), Wasco (2), Washington (67), and Yamhill (5).

Oregon’s 209th death was 73-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive June 20 and died June 30. She had underlying medical conditions.

The day’s case count was Oregon’s largest single day total since the beginning of the pandemic, following the previous largest on Wednesday. Oregon had experienced five weeks of case growth and cases were rising faster in rural communities and in central and eastern Oregon.

At 1:30 p.m. Pacific Time there were 2,816,633 cases in the United States, with 1,180,878 recoveries and 131,332 deaths. National testing reached 35,334,800. Worldwide there were 10,935,672 cases, with 5,905,532 recoveries and 521,757 deaths. Global testing reached 245,446,276.

July 1, 2020

Klamath County reported its first death and a new case that brought the case count to 123. Oregon Health Authority did not report the death. However, a death in Marion County brought the state’s death toll to 208.

OHA reported 281 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 8,931. It is the highest daily case count since the beginning of the pandemic.

The new cases Were in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (2), Clackamas (20), Clatsop (1), Columbia (1), Deschutes (4), Douglas (2), Jackson (3), Jefferson (7), Klamath (4), Lake (2), Lane (12), Lincoln (12), Linn (7), Malheur (16), Marion (27), Morrow (2), Multnomah (38), Polk (8), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (42), Union (5), Wallowa (2), Wasco (4), Washington (48), and Yamhill (7).

Oregon’s 208th death was a 91-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive June 18 and died June 29. Her place of death is being confirmed. She had underlying medical conditions.

More information was available about Oregon’s 192nd death, which was initially reported June 22. Oregon’s 192nd death was a 90-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive June 18 and died June 21, at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

At 8 p.m. Pacific Time there were 2,779,953 cases in the United States, with 1,164,680 recoveries and 130,798 deaths. National testing reached 34,855,642. Worldwide there were 10,802,849 cases, with 5,733,105 recoveries and 518,921 deaths. Global testing reached 243,646,036.

June 30, 2020

Klamath County announced four new cases, bringing the case count to 122. Oregon had three more deaths, raising the toll to 207. The Oregon Health Authority reported 181 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 8,656.

The new cases reported were in the following counties: Clackamas (19), Coos (1), Deschutes (10), Jackson (5), Jefferson (12), Josephine (2), Klamath (3), Lake (2), Lane (7), Lincoln (3), Linn (4), Malheur (7), Marion (25), Multnomah (38), Polk (2), Umatilla (9), Union (10), Wasco (1), Washington (18), and Yamhill (3).

Oregon’s 205th death was a 74-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive June 18 and died June 29, in his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 206th death was a 93-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive June 19 and died June 29, at Salem Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.  

Oregon’s 207th death was a 66-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive June 12 and died June 27, at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

At 2 p.m. Pacific Time the United States had 2,711,718 cases, with 1,126,719 recoveries and 129,341 deaths. National testing reached 33,568,878. Worldwide there were 10,527,814 cases, with 5,532,313 recoveries and 511,466 deaths. Global testing reached 239,266,255.

June 29, 2020

Two more deaths brought the state’s death toll to 204. Oregon Health Authority reported 146 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 8,485.

The new were in the following counties: Clackamas (18), Deschutes (2), Douglas (2), Jackson (3), Jefferson (3), Josephine (1), Klamath (5), Lake (2), Lane (6), Malheur (5), Marion (14), Multnomah (29), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (15), Union (5), Wasco (6), Washington (27), and Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 203rd death was an 84-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive June 18 and died June 27. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 204th death was a 72-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive June 17 and died June 27. He had underlying medical conditions.

At 1 p.m. Pacific Time there were 2,657,765 cases in the United States, with 1,099,727 recoveries and 128,594 deaths. National testing reached 32,891,814. Worldwide there were 10,338,275 cases, with 5,403,877 recoveries and 506,153 deaths. Global testing reached 236,811,940.

June 28, 2020

Klamath County announced seven new cases, raising the tally to 118. Oregon Health Authority reported 247 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 8,341. The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (18), Clatsop (1), Columbia (1), Deschutes (8), Jackson (9), Jefferson (3), Josephine (1), Lane (3), Lincoln (3), Malheur (11), Marion (43), Morrow (8), Multnomah (52), Polk (3), Umatilla (48), Union (2), Wasco (3), Washington (29), Yamhill (1).

At 7:30 p.m. Pacific Time, there were 2,637,077 cases in the United States, with 1,093,456 recoveries and 128,437 deaths. National testing reached 32,592,368. Worldwide there were 10,243,010 cases, with 5,347,287 recoveries and 504,366 deaths. Global testing reached 235,427,540.

June 27, 2020

Another death brought the state’s death toll to 202. On Friday, Oregon Heath Authority erroneously reported that Oregon’s 202nd death was a woman who tested positive June 22. The total number of COVID-19 deaths in Oregon is 202.

OHA reported 277 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 8,094.

The new cases were in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (16), Columbia (1), Coos (1), Crook (1), Deschutes (3), Jefferson (3), Josephine (2), Lake (1), Lane (14), Lincoln (2), Linn (4), Malheur (12), Marion (32), Morrow (5), Multnomah (59), Polk (2), Umatilla (56), Union (11), Wasco (2), Washington (44), Yamhill (4).

Oregon’s 202nd COVID-19 death was an 84-year-old man in Multnomah County who became symptomatic June 21, after close contact with a confirmed case, and died June 22.  He had underlying medical conditions.

At 11 p.m. Pacific Time there were 2,596,537 cases in the United States, with 1,081,437 recoveries and 128,152 deaths. National testing reached 31,998,024. Worldwide there were 10,086,969 cases, with 5,258,422 recoveries and 501,393 deaths. Global testing reached 233,583,346.

June 26, 2020

Five more Oregonians died, raising the state’s death toll to 202. Oregon Health Authority reported 250 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 7,818.

The new cases were in the following counties: Benton (4), Clackamas (17), Columbia (1), Deschutes (4), Douglas (4), Jackson (5), Jefferson (6), Josephine (2), Lake (3), Lane (10), Lincoln (4), Linn (4), Malheur (13), Marion (18), Morrow (12), Multnomah (61), Umatilla (22), Union (12), Wasco (3), Washington (39), and Yamhill (6).

Oregon’s 198th death was a 96-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive June 18 and died June 25, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 199th death was a 90-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive June 19 and died June 25, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 200th death was a 79-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive June 18 and died June 24, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 201st death was a 90-year-old woman in Union County who tested positive June 13 and died June 25, at Grande Ronde Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 202nd death was a 74-year-old woman in Morrow County who tested positive June 22. Additional information about this COVID-19 related death was still pending.

In order to clarify face covering use requirements, OHA updated its guidance document for residents of Clackamas, Hood River, Lincoln, Marion, Multnomah, Polk and Washington counties.

In these counties, face covering use was required in all businesses and for the general public when visiting these businesses and for the general public when visiting indoor spaces open to the public.

The Governor also released general guidance for the use of face coverings in counties beyond the specified counties.

In the guidelines, indoor spaces were defined as spaces, whether publicly owned or privately owned, "where the public has access by right or invitation, express or implied, whether by payment of money or not." In addition to the public areas of the businesses those spaces include building lobbies or common spaces, elevators, and buildings or meeting rooms outside of private homes where people gather for social, civic, cultural or religious purposes.

At 9 p.m. Pacific Time there were 2,552,956 cases in the United States, with 1,068,703 recoveries and 127,640 deaths. National tests numbered 31,352,500. Worldwide there were 9,906,585 cases, with 5,152,147 recoveries and 496,915 deaths. Global tests numbered 231,238,525.      

June 25, 2020

Klamath County announced seven new cases, bringing the count to 111. Oregon had two more deaths, raising the toll to 197. Oregon Health Authority reported 124 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 7,568.

The new cases were in the following counties: Benton (6), Clackamas (8), Clatsop (1), Coos (2), Deschutes (2), Klamath (13), Lake (3), Lane (5), Linn (2), Malheur (2), Marion (4), Morrow (1), Multnomah (29), Polk (2), Umatilla (8), Union (10), Wasco (1), Washington (24), and Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 196th death was an 83-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive June 18 and died June 24, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 197th death was an 83-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive June 18 and died June 23, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Notes: One case previously reported in Jackson County was determined not to be a case. The county case count has been appropriately adjusted.

At 5 p.m. Pacific Time there were 2,500,995 cases in the United States, with 1,048,031 recoveries and 126,720 deaths. National testing reached 30,660,452. Worldwide there were 9,697,224 cases, with 5,044,846 recoveries and 490,910 deaths. Global testing reached 228,584,251.

June 24, 2020

Klamath County announced seven new cases, bringing the case count to 104. The state’s death toll increased by three to 195. Oregon Health Authority reported 171 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 7,444.

The new cases were in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (8), Clatsop (1), Deschutes (4), Jackson (2), Jefferson (3), Klamath (3), Lincoln (9), Linn (1), Malheur (5), Marion (13), Multnomah (45), Polk (1), Umatilla (35), Union (5), Wasco (2), Washington (31), Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 193rd death was a 63-year-old man in Lincoln County who tested positive June 11 and died June 23, at Samaritan Pacific Community Hospital. He did not have underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 194th death was a 78-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive June 16 and died June 22, his place of death is being confirmed. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 195th death was an 87-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive June 17 and died June 23, at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Note: One case previously reported in Hood River County was determined not to be a case; the county case count has been appropriately adjusted.

At noon Pacific Time there were 2,441,637 cases in the United States, with 1,025,285 recoveries and 123,864 deaths. Worldwide there were 9,439,116 cases, with 4,894,607 recoveries and 482,046 deaths. At 6:30 p.m. testing reached 30,059,864 nationally and 135,837,147 globally.

June 23, 2020

Klamath County announced three new cases, bringing the count to 97. There were 52 recoveries included in the total. Oregon Health Authority reported 191 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 7,274.

The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (25), Coos (1), Deschutes (2), Hood River (1), Jackson (1), Jefferson (2), Klamath (7), Lane (1), Malheur (2), Marion (17), Morrow (3), Multnomah (44), Polk (1), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (19), Union (19), Wasco (4), and Washington (42).

New information was available about Oregon’s 191st death, which was originally reported Monday, June 22. He was a 68-year-old man in Lincoln County who died June 16 in his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Notes: One case previously reported in Benton County was determined not to be a case; the county case count has been appropriately adjusted.

New workplace outbreak reported: An outbreak of 37 COVID-19 cases has been reported at Lamb Weston in Umatilla County. The case counts include all persons linked to the outbreak, which may include household members and other close contacts. 

The investigation started on June 16, but the initial case count was below the threshold for public disclosure. OHA is now publicly reporting COVID-19 outbreaks of more than 20 cases in workplaces with more than 30 employees in its daily news release Monday through Friday.

June 22, 2020

Klamath County announced six new cases, bringing the count to 94. Two more Oregonians died, raising the state’s death toll to 192. Oregon Health Authority reported 146 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 7,083. The new cases reported were in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (15), Deschutes (4), Douglas (1), Hood River (1), Jackson (1), Jefferson (1), Lane (4), Lincoln (6), Marion (47), Morrow (1), Multnomah (17), Umatilla (11), Union (5), Wasco (1), Washington (27), and Yamhill (2).

Oregon’s 191st death was a 68-year-old man in Lincoln County who died June 16 in his residence and tested positive June 17. He did not have underlying medical conditions. 

Oregon’s 192nd death was a 90-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive June 18. Additional information about this COVID-19 related death is still pending. An update will be provided when we have additional information.

June 21, 2020

Another death brought Oregon’s death toll to 190. Oregon Health Authority reported 190 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 6,937. The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (12), Deschutes (1), Jackson (3), Klamath (4), Lane (7), Lincoln (2), Linn (1), Malheur (2), Marion (7), Morrow (3), Multnomah (84), Polk (1), Umatilla (34), Union (3), Wallowa (1), Wasco (1), Washington (22), Yamhill (2).

Oregon’s 190th death was a 93-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive June 6 and died June 20 in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Note: One case previously reported in Benton County was determined to be a resident of Linn County; county case counts were adjusted to reflect this change.

June 20, 2020

Klamath County announced three new cases, bringing the count to 88. Oregon’s death toll raised by one to 189. Oregon Health Authority reported 178 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 6,750.

The new cases were in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (19), Coos (3), Douglas (1), Jackson (2), Jefferson (1), Klamath (4), Lane (2), Lincoln (23), Linn (1), Malheur (6), Marion (30), Morrow (1), Multnomah (34), Umatilla (4), Union (2), Wallowa (2), Wasco (4), and Washington (37).

Oregon’s 189th death was a 53-year-old man in Morrow County who tested positive June 12 and died June 18, in his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Note: Two cases previously reported in Polk County were determined not to be cases; the county case count has been adjusted to reflect this.

June 19, 2020

Klamath County announced six new cases, bringing the count to 95. With another death, Oregon’s death toll became 188. Oregon Health Authority reported 206 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 6,572. The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (23), Coos (1), Deschutes (3), Douglas (3), Hood River (2), Jefferson (4), Klamath (12), Lane (3), Lincoln (31), Linn (1), Malheur (1), Marion (20), Morrow (5), Multnomah (49), Umatilla (24), Union (6), Wallowa (1), Washington (17).

Oregon’s 188th death was an 84-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive June 3 and died June 10, in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

June 18, 2020

Klamath County announced 14 new cases, bringing the tally to 79. Four more Oregonians died, raising the state’s death toll to 187. Oregon Health Authority reported 148 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 6,366. The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (12), Columbia (4), Hood River (3), Jefferson (4), Klamath (4), Lincoln (4), Linn (1), Malheur (4), Marion (26), Morrow (4), Multnomah (33), Polk (3), Umatilla (13), Union (5), Washington (25), Yamhill (3).

Oregon’s 184th death was an 82-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive June 4 and died June 14. Her place of death is being confirmed. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 185th death was a 78-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive June 11 and died June 15 in his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 186th death was an 89-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive June 6 and died June 16. His place of death was being confirmed. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 187th death was an 87-year-old man in Clackamas County who became symptomatic May 13, after close contact with a confirmed case, and died May 23. His place of death was being confirmed. He had underlying medical conditions.

June 17, 2020

Klamath County announced four new cases, raising the tally to 65. The state’s death toll became 183, with the death of another Oregonian. Oregon Health Authority reported 122 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 6,218. The new cases were in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (17), Deschutes (2), Jackson (2) Josephine (2), Klamath (3), Lake (1), Lincoln (3), Marion (17), Morrow (1), Multnomah (34), Polk (1), Umatilla (12), Union (2), Washington (22).

Oregon’s 183rd death was a 95-year-old woman in Clackamas County, who tested positive June 4 and died June 11. Her place of death was being confirmed. She had underlying medical conditions.

Notes: One case previously reported in Linn County was determined not to be a case; the county case count was adjusted appropriately.

One case previously reported in Hood River County was determined not to be a case; the county case count was adjusted appropriately.

June 16, 2020

The state’s death toll increased to 182. Oregon Health Authority reported 278 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 6,098. The cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (21), Crook (1), Hood River (1), Jackson (1), Jefferson (1), Josephine (1), Klamath (8), Lane (1), Lincoln (17), Marion (22), Morrow (2), Multnomah (42), Umatilla (1), Union (119), Wasco (1), Washington (37), Yamhill (2).

Oregon’s 181st death was an 89-year-old man in Clackamas County, who tested positive June 13 and died June 15, in his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 182nd death was an 85-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive June 11 and died June 13, at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

June 15, 2020

Klamath County announced 10 new cases, bringing the case county to 61. The Oregon death toll increased to 180. Oregon Health Authority reported 184 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 5,820. The cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (6), Hood River (1), Jackson (1), Jefferson (1), Klamath (2), Lake (1), Malheur (2), Marion (4), Multnomah (37), Polk (3), Umatilla (9), Union (99), Wasco (2), Washington (15), Yamhill (1).

OHA is coordinating with Union County public health authorities to respond to an outbreak of COVID-19. The outbreak explains the high number of cases today in Union County.

Oregon’s 177th death was a 78-year-old woman in Clackamas County, who tested positive June 6 and died June 12 in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 178th death was an 85-year-old man in Clackamas County, who tested positive June 5 and died June 14 in his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 179th death was a 65-year-old woman in Clackamas County, who tested positive June 5 and died June 12 in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 180th death was a 75-year-old woman in Clackamas County, who tested positive June 4 and died June 11 in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

June 14, 2020

Klamath County announced two new cases, bringing the case count to 51. Two more lives were lost, increasing the state’s death toll to 176. Oregon Health Authority reported 101 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 5,636.

The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (10), Columbia (1), Klamath (3), Lane (1), Lincoln (8), Linn (1), Malheur (2), Marion (20), Morrow (1), Multnomah (32), Umatilla (1), Union (8), Washington (13).

Oregon’s 175th death was a 95-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive May 13 and died June 8, at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 176th death was a 70-year-old woman in Washington County, who tested positive May 4 and died June 8, at Portland Providence Medical Center. She did not have underlying medical conditions.

June 13, 2020

Klamath County announced two new cases, bringing the case count to 49. Another life was lost in Oregon, bringing the state’s death toll to 174. Oregon Health Authority reported 158 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 5,535.

The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (17), Columbia (1), Hood River (10), Jackson (3), Jefferson (2), Lane (3), Lincoln (14), Linn (1), Malheur (1), Marion (21), Morrow (1), Multnomah (47), Polk (7), Umatilla (13), Union (2), Wasco (1), Washington (14).

Oregon’s 174th death was an 87-year-old man in Umatilla County, who tested positive May 30 and died June 11, at St. Anthony Hospital in Pendleton. He had underlying medical conditions.

June 12, 2020

Klamath County announced two new cases, bringing the count to 48. The state’s death toll rose by two to 173. Oregon Health Authority reported 142 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 5,377. The cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (9), Columbia (3), Deschutes (2), Hood River (3), Jackson (2), Klamath (2), Lincoln (14), Marion (29), Multnomah (36), Polk (9), Umatilla (5), Union (4), Wasco (3), Washington (21).

Oregon’s 172nd death was a 96-year-old man in Washington County, who tested positive May 10 and died June 11 in his residence. He did not have underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 173rd death was a 68-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive June 1 and died June 10 at Adventist Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

More information is available for Oregon’s 164th death. He was a 71-year-old man in Malheur County, who tested positive June 1 and died May 31 at the Saint Alphonsus Medical Center in Boise. He had underlying medical conditions.

Notes: Two cases previously reported in Jefferson County were determined not to be cases; the county case count has been adjusted to reflect this.

At 2:30 p.m. Pacific Time, there were 2,112,194 cases in the United States, with 825,183 recoveries and 116,723 deaths. National testing reached 23,595,827. Worldwide there were 7,709,464 cases, with 3,689,577 recoveries and 427,202 deaths. Global testing reached 108,333,721.

June 11, 2020

Oregon’s death toll increased by two, reaching 171. Oregon Health Authority reported 178 new cases, bringing the state total to 5,237. The cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (47), Clatsop (1), Crook (2), Deschutes (1), Hood River (1), Jefferson (3), Lake (2), Lane (3), Lincoln (9), Marion (34), Multnomah (43), Polk (4), Umatilla (4), Union (1), Wallowa (1), Wasco (1), Washington (15), Yamhill (6).

Oregon’s 170th death was an 84-year-old woman in Clackamas County, who tested positive June 6 and died June 9. The location of her death is unknown at this time. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 171st death was a 66-year-old man in Yamhill County, who tested positive June 3 and died June 10, at Willamette Valley Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Today’s COVID-19 case count marked the highest daily count since the onset of the pandemic in Oregon. The reasons for the higher numbers are tied to several factors including widespread availability of testing, increased contact tracing, and active monitoring of close contacts of cases. Workplace outbreaks are another source of the high number.

Higher case counts serve as a reminder that Oregonians need to continue to maintain physical distancing, wear face coverings where physical distancing cannot be maintained and follow good hand hygiene.

At 2:30 p.m. Pacific Time there were 2,077,567 cases in the United States, with 810,350 recoveries and 115,576 deaths. National testing reached 22,911,426. Worldwide there were 7,540,010 cases, with 3,616,795 recoveries and 421,394 deaths. Global testing reached 106,166,695.

June 10, 2020

Oregon Health Authority reported 72 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 5,060. The cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (6), Hood River (2), Jackson (6), Jefferson (6), Lane (1), Lincoln (4), Marion (5), Multnomah (32), Umatilla (4), Washington (6).

At 8 p.m. Pacific Time there were 2,066,401 cases in the United States, with 808,494 recoveries and 115,130 deaths. National testing reached 22,625,758. Worldwide there were 7,452,091 cases, with 3,543,944 recoveries and 418,893 deaths. Global testing reached 104,557,512.

June 9, 2020

The state’s death toll rose to 169. Oregon Health Authority reported 70 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 4,988. The cases were in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (16), Columbia (1), Hood River (6), Lincoln (2), Marion (8), Multnomah (27), Polk (1), Union (1), Washington (7).

Oregon’s 165th death was a 78-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive May 6 and died May 27 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 166th death was a 96-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive May 27 and died June 7 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 167th death was a 70-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive June 5 and died June 8 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 168th death was a 60-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive May 21 and died June 4 at Kaiser Westside Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 169th death was a 96-year-old man in Clackamas County, who became symptomatic May 31, after close contact with a confirmed case, and died June 3 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

June 8, 2020

From The Oregonian:

Pacific Seafood on Sunday disclosed that 124 of its employees and local contractors have tested positive for coronavirus in what is the second largest workplace outbreak of the virus in the state to date.

The number reported by the business is nearly twice what the Oregon Health Authority initially reported Sunday morning. An Oregon Health Authority spokesman said the state pulls the data once a day and that the number of confirmed positives had risen since it collected the data early Sunday.

The public health investigation into the outbreak began June 2, according to the state. State officials said the initial tally fell below the threshold for public disclosure, which the state set at more than five cases in workplaces with more than 30 workers.

Officials said the risk to the public is low.

On Sunday, Pacific Seafood issued a statement saying it provided testing for 376 workers at its five Newport facilities.

Fifty-three employees and 71 local contractors tested positive.

The company said 95 percent of those who tested positive did not report any symptoms. None have been hospitalized. The positive tests are concentrated at the Pacific shrimp processing facility location.

The company said it has suspended operations at all five locations. It also said it would carry out “detailed contract tracing.”

Klamath County announced case 46. Oregon Health Authority reported 114 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 4,922. The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (13), Hood River (3), Jefferson (1), Klamath (1), Lane (1), Lincoln (61), Marion (8), Multnomah (16), Umatilla (8), Washington (2).

The high number in Lincoln County is related to an outbreak at Pacific Seafood. Outbreak totals will be reported in Wednesday’s COVID-19 Weekly Report.

At noon Pacific Time there were 2,015,719 cases in the United States, with 765,622 recoveries and 112,778 deaths. National testing reached 21,539,064. Worldwide there were 7,153,652 cases, with 3,289,047 recoveries and 407,711 deaths. Global testing reached 100,111,216.

June 7, 2020

At noon Pacific Time there were 1,997,810 cases in the United States, with 752,925 recoveries and 112,269 deaths. National testing reached 21,005,406. Worldwide there were 7,046,933 cases, with 3,236,826 recoveries and 403,561 deaths. Global testing reached 97,594,620.

June 6, 2020

The Oregon Health Authority this weekend will no longer provide some real-time statistics about the coronavirus pandemic, making it more difficult to track daily progress.

State health officials said they will continue publicly reporting deaths, infections and presumed infections by county each Saturday and Sunday. But officials don’t plan to provide detailed daily reports or update the state’s website over the weekend with other key statistics.

“COVID-19 isn’t going away any time soon” OHA spokesman Rob Cowie said in a statement. “We know our public health response is going to be a marathon, not a sprint. While we are glad there are many people who follow changes in the daily numbers closely, OHA needs to adjust our reporting schedule so we can sustain our capacity.”

The state’s death toll increased by two to 163. Oregon Health Authority reported 93 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 4,662. The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (7), Hood River (7), Jackson (2), Jefferson (2), Lincoln (6), Malheur (1), Marion (11), Morrow (1), Multnomah (28), Polk (3), Umatilla (6), Wallowa (1), Wasco (1), Washington (15), Yamhill (2).

Oregon’s 162nd death was a 70-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive April 8 and died May 9 in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 163rd death was a 50-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive April 23 and died May 29 in his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s weekly testing summary for the week ending June 5 shows that 20,539 people were tested, above the minimum weekly goal of 15,000 outlined in the COVID-19 Strategic Testing plan for Oregon.

As of week’s end, the cumulative positive testing rate was 3.1 percent of tests performed. This is lower than the national average of 11 percent. The decreasing rate of positive test results reflects the success of Oregonians in following the Governor’s stay-at-home order, along with increasing testing statewide.

At 2:30 p.m. Pacific Time there were 1,983,747 cases in the United States, with 746,937 recoveries and 111,977 deaths. National testing numbered 20,607,851. Worldwide there were 6,943,843 cases, with 3,195,642 recoveries and 400,891 deaths. Global testing numbered 95,979,224.

June 5, 2020

At noon Pacific Time there were 1,936,145 cases in the United States, with 715,511 recoveries and 110,699 deaths. Processed tests numbered 19,944,047. Worldwide there were 6,774,648 cases, with 3,096,929 recoveries and 395,611 deaths. Global tests numbered 93,546,541.

June 4, 2020

Global recoveries reached 3 million. Oregon Health Authority reported 76 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 4,474. The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (9), Coos (1), Crook (1), Deschutes (5), Jackson (1), Jefferson (1), Lane (3), Lincoln (5), Linn (2), Marion (12), Multnomah (30), Umatilla (1), Wasco (1), Washington (3), Yamhill (1).

At noon Pacific Time there were 1,912,897 cases in the United States, with 692,729 recoveries and 109,705 deaths. Nationwide 19,376,789 tests had been processed. Worldwide there were 6,647,305 cases, with 3,000,369 recoveries and 390,453 deaths. A total of 91,263,164 tests had been processed.

June 3, 2020

David Leonhardt wrote in The New York Times daily briefing:

“A lot of people are reading scientific papers for the first time these days, hoping to make sense of the coronavirus pandemic,” Carl Zimmer writes in his latest Matter column. Unfortunately, many scientific papers are hard to read. They’re full of jargon and aren’t intended for a general audience.

But when Carl speaks to scientists on the phone, he often finds that they can tell a riveting, clear story about their research. Of course, most people aren’t going to cold-call scientists — but there is still a good alternative to trying to muddle through academic research papers: Follow the scientists on social media.

“Leading epidemiologists and virologists have been posting thoughtful threads on Twitter,” Carl writes, “laying out why they think new papers are good or bad.” I asked Carl for a list of scientists that people should follow, and he sent me 19 names. They include the virologists Florian Krammer and Angela Rasmussen, the epidemiologists Marc Lipsitch and Caitlin Rivers and the immunologist Akiko Iwasaki.

Oregon’s death count reached 159. Oregon Health Authority reported 65 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 4,399. The new cases were in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (7), Deschutes (1), Douglas (1), Hood River (6), Jackson (1), Jefferson (1), Lincoln (1), Linn (1), Marion (18), Multnomah (13), Polk (1), Umatilla (2), Wasco (2), Washington (5), Yamhill (4).

Oregon’s 158th death was a 68-year-old man in Clackamas County, who tested positive May 21 and died June 2 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 159th death was a 60-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive April 17 and died May 30 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

At noon Pacific Time there were 1,891,430 cases in the United States, with 649,189 recoveries and 108,608 deaths. National tests numbered 18,874,077, with the global total at 89,263,015. Worldwide there were 6,518,109 cases, with 2,897,029 recoveries and 384,808 deaths. 

June 2, 2020

Oregon had three more fatalities, raising the state’s death toll to 157. Oregon Health Authority reported 33 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 4,335. The cases were in the following counties: Benton (1), Hood River (4), Lincoln (2), Linn (1), Marion (8), Multnomah (10), Umatilla (1), Wasco (2), Washington (4).

Oregon’s 155th death was a 36-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive and died May 31 at Adventist Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 156th death was a 66-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive April 1 and died May 22 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 157th death was an 81-year-old woman in Washington County, who tested positive April 6 and died May 26 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

At 1 p.m. Pacific Time there were 1,873,009 cases in the United States, with 618,867 recoveries and 107,783 deaths. Worldwide there were 6,44,734 cases, with 2,742,279 recoveries and 380,525 deaths.

June 1, 2020

Oregon’s death toll reached 154. Oregon Health Authority reported 59 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 4,302. The cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (5), Deschutes (2), Jackson (1), Jefferson (11), Josephine (1), Lane (4), Lincoln (3), Linn (2), Marion (13), Morrow (1), Multnomah (6), Polk (2), Umatilla (4), Washington (4).

Oregon’s 154th death was a 59-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive May 29 and died the same day at Salem Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

At 3:30 p.m. Pacific Time there were 1,857,447 cases in the United States, with 608,487 recoveries and 106,876 deaths. Worldwide there were 6,354,644 cases, with 2,887,650 recoveries and 376,795 deaths.

May 31, 2020


Oregon Health Authority reported 58 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 4,243.The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (6), Deschutes (1), Hood River (2), Jackson (1), Jefferson (3), Lane (4), Marion (11), Multnomah (23), Wasco (1), Washington (5), Yamhill (1).

At 12:30 p.m. Pacific Time there were 1,783,132 cases in the United States. Recoveries were not available, but deaths numbered 104,166 and 17,449,404 tests were administered. Worldwide there were 6,225,752 cases, with 2,779,488 recoveries and 372,735 deaths; the tests administered to date numbered 83,815,349.

May 30,2020

Two more lives were lost in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 153. Oregon Health Authority reported 55 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 4,185.

The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (1), Deschutes (3), Douglas (1), Hood River (2), Jefferson (2), Klamath (2), Lane (1), Marion (7), Multnomah (21), Umatilla (2), Wasco (1), Washington (12).

Oregon’s 152nd death was a 62-year-old man in Lane County, who tested positive and died May 4; the location of death is awaiting confirmation. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 153rd death was a 93-year-old woman in Polk County, who tested positive May 2 and died May 28 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

At 3:30 p.m. Pacific Time there were 1,783,132 cases in the United States. Recovered case numbers were unavailable, but there were 104,166 deaths. Nationally, 17,190,520 tests had been performed. Worldwide there were 6,144,980 cases, with 2,726,918 recoveries and 370,413 deaths. Globally 81,786,474 tests had been performed.

May 29, 2020

Klamath County reported three new cases, as the Board of County Commissioners drafted a letter to apply for Phase 2 of Reopening Oregon.

Oregon Health Authority reported 48 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 4,131. The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (1), Curry (1), Douglas (1), Hood River (1), Jefferson (3), Klamath (1), Lane (1), Lincoln (2), Marion (11), Multnomah (18), Wasco (1), Washington (7).

Oregon’s 151st death, which was reported Thursday without details, was a 72-year-old man in Polk County who tested positive May 1 and died May 25 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

An outbreak of six cases has been connected to Duckwall Fruit in Hood River County. The investigation started May 28. State and county public health officials were working with the business to address the outbreak and protect the health of workers. The risk to the general public is considered low.

From The New York Times daily briefing:

Herd immunity is still far off

London, Madrid and other cities around the world have only a small fraction of the coronavirus cases needed to achieve herd immunity, according to new studies. Experts believe herd immunity — after which new infections will no longer cause large outbreaks — is reached when between 60 percent and 80 percent of the population has contracted the virus.

Even New York, the city with the world’s highest known infection rate, is barely a third of the way there, according to the studies.

Parisians, annoyed at government restrictions, have adopted a rebellious new drinking tradition: the apérue, in which revelers gather on the city’s streets (or rues) to enjoy pre-dinner drinks.

The C.D.C. is suggesting big changes to workplaces, including regular temperature checks, spread-out desks and the closing of common areas.

For the first time in its 124-year history, the Boston Marathon has been canceled. Organizers plan to hold a virtual race instead, with people running the 26.2 miles remotely.

At 11 a.m. Pacific Time there were 1,777,857 cases in the United States, with 502,116 recoveries and 103,822 deaths. A total of 16,099,515 tests had been processed in US states and territories since the COVID-19 crisis began. Worldwide there were 5,971,162 cases, with 2,629,624 recoveries and 364,301 deaths.

May 28, 2020

From The New York Times daily briefing:

Can you get the virus from a surface?

As lockdowns lift, many more Americans are going to come in contact with surfaces that other people have touched: doorknobs, tabletops, shopping bags and more. And I know that many people find these situations confusing.

The early scientific advice seemed to encourage people to treat surface contact with utmost seriousness. More recently, research has suggested that few people get the virus this way. The main transmission mechanism instead appears to be close contact with someone who has the virus, like talking face-to-face or sitting nearby in an indoor setting. Those situations expose people to enough of a “viral load” to become infected.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently tried to clarify its guidance on the subject: “It may be possible that a person can get Covid-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this isn’t thought to be the main way the virus spreads.”

So how should you think about surface transmission?

It doesn’t seem to be common, but it does seem possible. It is the most likely explanation for an outbreak at a Chinese shopping mall, as my colleague Tara Parker-Pope points out.

One thing to understand is that merely touching virus particles isn’t enough to become infected. You probably have to touch many particles — and then touch your face. Objects that a small number of other people briefly touch, like groceries and shopping bags, seem to present a very small risk. That’s why I have stopped wiping down every object that comes into my house, as I was when the lockdown began.

In the spectrum of risk, you should worry more about face-to-face conversations and extended time in indoor spaces with people who are outside your household.

Three more lives were lost in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 151. Oregon Health Authority reported 49 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 4,086. They were in the following counties: Clackamas (4), Deschutes (1), Jefferson (1), Malheur (5), Marion (11), Multnomah (10), Umatilla (2), Wasco (1), Washington (12), Yamhill (2).

Seven of the new total cases are related to the Townsend Farms outbreak.

Note: Due to data reconciliation, the Lincoln County case count decreased by one. A confirmed case had been counted twice.

Oregon’s 149th death was a 73-year-old woman in Clackamas County, who tested positive May 8 and died May 16 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 150th death was a 73-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive May 6 and died May 26 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 151st 19 death was a 72-year-old man in Polk County, who tested positive May 1. Additional information about his death is still pending. 

At noon Pacific Time there were 1,746,585 cases in the United States, with 375,171 recoveries and 102,391 deaths. Worldwide there were 5,858,573 cases, with 2,540,838 recoveries and 359,991 deaths.

May 27, 2020

From The New York Times daily briefing:

  • An emergency program created by Congress to replace school meals during the coronavirus outbreak reached only about 15 percent of eligible children, according to an analysis by The Times. One problem: Outdated state computers.
  • Congressional Democrats proposed a $50 billion relief package for the child care industry, which is struggling while families are on lockdown.
  • Congressional Republicans sued Speaker Nancy Pelosi to block remote legislating by the House of Representatives during the pandemic.
  • Joe Biden called President Trump an “absolute fool” for refusing to wear a mask in public on Memorial Day.
  • A renter crisis is expected in the coming months with an “avalanche of evictions” as protections and federal aid run out.

Oregon Health Authority reported 71 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 4,038. They were in the following counties: Clackamas (4), Hood River (1), Jackson (5), Lake (2), Lincoln (2), Marion (6), Multnomah (41), Polk (2), Wasco (2), Washington (5), Yamhill (1).

At noon Pacific Time the number of tests completed to date in the United States and its territories was 14,907,041. Cases in the US totaled 1,724,416, with 366,457 recoveries and 100,940 deaths. Worldwide there were 5,744,686 cases, with 2,471,363 recoveries and 354,967 deaths.

May 26, 2020

From The New York Times daily briefing:

Memorial Day crowds flocked to beaches, amusement parks, lakes and boardwalks on the first long weekend since the pandemic began.

Adherence to social-distancing rules varied widely. At the Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri, vacationers “packed into yacht clubs, outdoor bars and resort pools,” The Washington Post reported. On Tybee Island in Georgia, beachgoers largely respected rules on distancing, according to CNN.

“The big takeaway is that not all exposures are the same,” Apoorva Mandavilli of The Times’s science desk said. “Beaches, as crowded as they might be, are still probably safer than restaurants, bars or churches. However, that’s not a free pass, either, if you’re sitting close to someone and engaging in prolonged conversation. Experts have likened it to cigarette smoke. If you’re close enough to feel or smell the smoke, you might also be exposed to the virus.”

Oregon Health Authority reported 18 new confirmed and one new presumptive case, bringing the state total to 3,967. The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (2), Crook (1), Marion (5), Multnomah (7), Washington (3), Yamhill (1).

At 9 a.m. Pacific Time there were 1,702,196 cases in the United States, with 353,043 recoveries and 99,624 deaths. Worldwide there were 5,637,525 cases, with 2,404,977 recoveries and 349,300 deaths.

May 25, 2020

Oregon Health Authority reported 19 new confirmed and four new presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 3,949. The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (4), Deschutes (1), Jackson (3), Josephine (1), Marion (4), Multnomah (5), Umatilla (1), Washington (5).

At 1 p.m. Pacific Time there were 1,689,179 cases in the United States, with 349,143 recoveries and 98,334 deaths. Worldwide there were 5,560,461 cases, with 2,334,790 recoveries and 346,557 deaths.

May 24, 2020

The New York Times published information about some of the nationwide deaths attributed to COVID-19 as the total neared 100,000. Descriptions of the lives of a thousand people in the United States who died because of the coronavirus were drawn from hundreds of obituaries, news articles and paid death notices that appeared in newspapers and digital media over the past few months. 

COVID-19 claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 148. Oregon Health Authority reported 43 new confirmed and three new presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 3,927. The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (1), Crook (2), Deschutes (6), Jackson (2), Lincoln (1), Linn (4), Marion (7), Multnomah (3), Polk (1), Umatilla (1), Washington (17), Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 148th death was a 93-year-old woman in Clackamas County, who tested positive April 23 and died May 10 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

At 3 p.m. Pacific Time there were 1,673,225 cases in the United States, with 338,480 recoveries and 96,920 deaths. Worldwide there were 5,482,041 cases, with 2,290,832 recoveries and 346,083 deaths.

May 23, 2020

China recorded three new confirmed COVID-19 cases on the mainland, following the first day with no new cases since the outbreak began, the National Health Commission (NHC) said. Of the new cases, two were imported while one was a local transmission

Oregon Health Authority reported 28 new confirmed and seven new presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 3,888. The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (2), Clatsop (1), Crook (3), Deschutes (2), Jackson (1), Jefferson (1), Lane (1), Marion (10), Multnomah (4), Umatilla (2), Wallowa (1), Washington (6), Yamhill (1).

Notes:

  • The cutoff for data has changed to 12:01 a.m., which means the reporting period for this report was 16 hours. Subsequent reports will have the same data cutoff, so the reporting period will return to 24 hours.
  • Due to data reconciliation, three confirmed cases, one each originally reported in Jackson, Multnomah, and Washington counties, were determined not to be cases. They were subtracted from Friday’s state total, and the total number of cases in each county was reduced to reflect this change.
  • Due to data reconciliation, 10 presumptive cases had updated information and their case status was changed to reflect the new information.
  • Due to data reconciliation, one case originally reported in the 10–19 age group and one case originally reported in the 70–79 age group were determined not to be cases.

At 1 p.m. Pacific Time there were 1,646,606 cases in the United States, with 318,753 recoveries and 96,920 deaths. Worldwide there were 5,373,900 cases, with 2,225,949 recoveries and 342,717 deaths.

May 22, 2020

As worldwide numbers topped 5 million, the World Health Organization Director-General said:

One of the most essential services that has been disrupted is routine childhood immunisation.

Today, WHO is publishing new guidance on implementing mass vaccination campaigns in the context of COVID-19.

WHO, Unicef and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance and other partners are working to ensure that the pandemic does not reverse decades of progress against vaccine preventable childhood diseases.    

Today, I am pleased to be joined by UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore and Seth Berkley, CEO of GAVI.

Since the turn of the century, child mortality has been halved, in large part because of the power of safe and effective vaccination.

However, we’re here today to collectively reinforce the warning that COVID-19 threatens to undermine life-saving immunization services around the world.   

This risks putting tens of millions of children – in rich and poor countries – at risk of killer diseases like diphtheria, measles and pneumonia.

As the world comes together to develop a safe and effective vaccine for COVID-19, we must not forget the dozens of lifesaving vaccines that already exist and must continue to reach children everywhere. 

Initial analysis suggests the provision of routine immunization services is substantially hindered in at least 68 countries and is likely to affect approximately 80 million children under the age of 1 living in these countries. 

Any suspension of childhood vaccination services is a major threat to life.

Oregon saw two more fatalities, raising the state’s death toll to 147. Oregon Health Authority reported 45 new confirmed and three new presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 3,864. The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (5), Clatsop (2), Curry (1), Jackson (3), Linn (2), Malheur (4), Marion (8), Multnomah (11), Polk (1), Umatilla (1), Washington (10).

Oregon’s 146th death was a 53-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive May 18 and died May 20, at Salem Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 147th death was an 83-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive April 25 and died May 8, at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

At noon Pacific Time there were 1,620,806 cases, with 310,373 recoveries and 94,594 deaths. Worldwide there were 5,263,710 cases, with 2,126,313 recoveries and 337,852 deaths.

May 21, 2020

Another Oregon life was lost, raising the state’s death toll to 145. Oregon Health Authority reported 24 new confirmed cases, bringing the state total to 3,817. The new cases were in the following counties: Coos (1), Deschutes (1), Jefferson (1), Malheur (3), Marion (4), Multnomah (8), Umatilla (3), Washington (3).

Oregon’s 145th death was a 93-year-old woman in Polk County, who tested positive May 2 and died May 20 in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Note: Due to data reconciliation, two confirmed cases originally reported in Josephine County were determined not to be cases. They were subtracted from Wednesday’s state total, and the total number of cases in Josephine County went down to reflect this change.

Eight presumptive cases also were updated and their case status was changed to reflect the new information (five suspect, three confirmed).

At noon Pacific Time there were 1,591,731 cases in the United States, with 302,818 recoveries and 94,276 deaths. Recovery numbers were not available for every state. Worldwide there were 5,154,201 cases, with 2,055,691 recoveries and 332,424 deaths.

From The New York Times daily briefing: Sheri Fink is an investigative journalist with a medical degree who’s won Pulitzer Prizes for her coverage of Hurricane Katrina and Ebola. She’s recently been covering the virus in New York. And as New York hospitals move past the worst of the epidemic, we asked her if she saw any parallels to her earlier reporting. She replied:

I was reminded of a moment when I was in Liberia in 2014 during the Ebola outbreak. There were so many horrific scenes and so many more sick people than could be cared for. And then, all of a sudden, the numbers started going down. And everyone was scared — were we just not seeing new cases?

But, in fact, it turned out to be real. The curve was bending, and it was due to the painstaking work of people in the communities and work that people did to keep themselves and their families safe. One thing that the drop in new Covid cases tells us is that whatever techniques were put in place have had an effect.

May 20, 2020

There were four more deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 144. Oregon Health Authority reported 65 new confirmed and 10 new presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 3,801. The new cases were in the following counties: Benton (1), Clatsop (4), Deschutes (9), Josephine (2), Lane (1), Linn (1), Marion (24), Multnomah (13), Polk (1), Umatilla (4), Washington (14), Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 141st death was a 94-year-old woman in Washington County, who tested positive May 10 and died May 19 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 142nd death was a 90-year-old man in Washington County, who tested positive April 4 and died May 14 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 143rd death was a 75-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive May 9 and died May 18 at the Portland VA Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 144th death was a 58-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive May 3 and died May 8 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

At noon Pacific Time there were 1,559,750 cases in the United States. Not all states had reported recovery data, but deaths numbered 92,333. Worldwide there were 5,044,796 cases, with 1,998,665 recoveries and 327,445 deaths. Global recoveries were low, because of the lack of complete United States data.

May 19, 2020

Oregon’s death toll increased to 140. Oregon Health Authority reported 33 new confirmed and 8 new presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 3,726. The new confirmed and presumptive were in the following counties: Curry (1), Deschutes (6), Jackson (1), Marion (12), Multnomah (9), Umatilla (3), Washington (6), Yamhill (3).

Oregon’s 139th death was a 70-year-old woman in Umatilla County, who tested positive May 4 and died May 16 at Good Shepard Health Care System. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 140th death was a 69-year-old man in Linn County, who tested positive April 7 and died May 17 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Due to data reconciliation, two cases originally reported in Clackamas County were determined not to be cases. They were subtracted from Monday’s state total.

Due to data reconciliation, one case originally reported in the 80 and over age group was determined not to be a case.

The New York Times daily briefing offered insight into the pursuit of a vaccine:

Why vaccines are so slow

Early news about medical treatments — like yesterday’s announcement that a coronavirus vaccine has shown positive results in eight people — can feel both exciting and frustrating.

The frustrating part is the timing. Even if all continues to go well with the research into this vaccine, it won’t be available until late this year or early next year. Between now and then, the vaccine will have to endure two more research trials, one involving hundreds of people and the other involving thousands.

Given the virus’s terrible toll, that long process can seem strangely lacking in urgency. But scientists insist that it isn’t. Here are the key reasons they say that there are no easy or fast routes to a vaccine:

Early results don’t always stand. In 2015, the French drug company Sanofi began selling the first vaccine for dengue. The drug had made it through multiple research trials — although some researchers believed Sanofi had ignored worrisome signs. Sure enough, as children in the Philippines began using it, some contracted an even worse form of dengue. Today, use of the vaccine is highly restricted.

In recent testimony, Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious-disease expert, noted that a coronavirus vaccine could suffer from the same problem.

The larger point is that drugs that look good in small, initial studies often look less good when they’re tested in more people.

Side effects matter. A vaccine doesn’t merely need to work, as Katie Thomas, a Times reporter covering pharmaceuticals, explained to me. It needs not to have side effects that cause more damage than the virus itself.

This coronavirus seems to kill only a small percentage of people who get it. The side effects have the potential to do more damage, because any coronavirus vaccine will be given to billions of people, including many with underlying health problems.

Politics matter, too. Vaccines are the subject of frequent conspiracy theories and falsehoods. Given this skepticism, a coronavirus vaccine that did more harm than good could cause much broader damage.

It could lead people around the world to stop taking vaccines that actually work. That’s what happened in the Philippines after the dengue scandal.

All of which is a reminder that promising early results — like yesterday’s — often prove fleeting. Only about 10 percent of drugs that clear the first research phase ultimately make it to market.

At noon Pacific Time there were 1,561,201 cases in the United States, with 360,088 recoveries and 92,796 deaths. Worldwide there were 4,956,160 cases, with 1,940,202 recoveries and 323,296 deaths.

May 18, 2020

The New York Times daily briefing had this article:

How virus data can mislead

Life in New York City felt pretty normal in early March. Children were going to school. Restaurants and theaters were packed. On March 9, I recorded a podcast in front of a few hundred people in Times Square.

In hindsight, we know that the coronavirus was then sweeping across the city. Deaths peaked in early to mid-April. And the typical time from contraction to death is from three to five weeks, according to my colleague Apoorva Mandavilli — which suggests early March was near the peak for transmission.

Over the next couple of weeks, it’s going to be important to keep this recent history in mind. Without mass testing — and the United States is not doing mass testing — there is a lag before a virus outbreak becomes apparent. Most people who develop symptoms don’t do so for at least five days, and sometimes longer. The worst symptoms usually take almost three weeks to appear.

With more parts of the U.S. starting to reopen, many people will be tempted to look at the data this week and start proclaiming victory over the virus. But this week’s data won’t tell us much. It will instead reflect the reality from early May and late April, when much of the country was still on lockdown.

“The data are always two or three weeks old,” Ezekiel Emanuel of the University of Pennsylvania told me. “And we have a hard time understanding that things are different from what we’re looking at.” Crystal Watson of Johns Hopkins University told The Associated Press that we wouldn’t really know how reopening had affected the virus’s spread for five to six weeks.

It’s possible that the reopenings won’t cause the outbreaks that many epidemiologists fear — because many people will still stay home, or because they will venture out cautiously, or because the virus may spread more slowly in warmer air. But it’s also possible that the country will find itself suffering through a new wave of outbreaks in June.

Oregon’s death toll increased to 138. Oregon Health Authority reported 62 new confirmed and two new presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 3,687. The new confirmed and presumptive cases were in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (5), Clatsop (1), Deschutes (5), Jackson (1), Lane (1), Malheur (2), Marion (16), Multnomah (12), Umatilla (5), Union (1), Washington (10), Yamhill (2).

Oregon’s 138th death was a 69-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on May 16 and died the same day at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

At noon Pacific Time there were 1,535,288 cases in the United States, with 351,343 recoveries and 91,320 deaths. Worldwide there were 4,856,473 cases, with 1,888,127 recoveries and 318,390 deaths.

May 17, 2020

The World Health Organization daily situation report stated: Japan has agreed to contribute over US$2.7 million to help nine countries in the Americas strengthen their capacities to detect cases, monitor, and control outbreaks of COVID-19, as well as ensure that reliable public health information on the pandemic is available to people involved in the response and the general public.

Oregon Health Authority reported nine new confirmed and three new presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 3,623. The new confirmed and presumptive cases reported today are in the following counties: Deschutes (1), Douglas (1), Lincoln (1), Marion (3), Multnomah (5), Polk (1).

Due to data reconciliation, a confirmed case in Clackamas county was determined not to be a case. The number of cases between 40-49 was reduced by one as a result of this change.

At 4 p.m. Pacific Time there were 1,526,170 cases in the United States, with 344,909 recoveries and 90,931 deaths. Worldwide there were 4,796,703 cases, with 1,849,626 recoveries and 316,434 deaths. 

As of 7 p.m. London Time May 16, there had been 10,720,185 tests given in the United States.

May 16, 2020

The New York Times reported:

  • The number of new coronavirus cases confirmed in the United States has steadily declined in recent days. But that progress is uncertain.
  • With more than two-thirds of states significantly relaxing restrictions, an uptick in cases is widely predicted.
  • Opinion: How to Reopen the Economy by Exploiting the Coronavirus’s Weak Spot: People can work in two-week cycles, on the job for four days then, by the time they might become infectious, 10 days at home in lockdown.

Oregon Health Authority reported 64 new confirmed and seven new presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 3,612. The new confirmed and presumptive cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (4), Clatsop (1), Deschutes (1), Lane (3), Linn (1), Malheur (2), Marion (27), Multnomah (22), Umatilla (2), Wasco (2), Washington (8), Yamhill (2).

Note: Due to four positive lab results, four presumptive cases are now considered confirmed cases, but they do not impact the confirmed case counts in today’s statewide total. These cases have been added as new confirmed cases in the list of new cases by county.

During routine data reconciliation, confirmed cases originally reported in the following counties – Baker (2), Douglas (1), and Wallowa (1) – were determined not to be cases. They were subtracted from Friday’s state total, and the total number of cases in each county was reduced to reflect this change.

At 3 p.m. Pacific Time there were 1,503,629 cases in the United States, with 337,559 recoveries and 89,442 deaths. Worldwide there were 4,706,986 cases, with 1,802,960 recoveries and 311,916 deaths.

May 15, 2020

The New York Times reported:

  • About one quarter of the people who have died in England had diabetes, according to The Independent.
  • A new study suggests that talking can cause droplets containing the virus to stay in the air for up to 14 minutes.
  • Cases have been found for the first time in Rohingya refugee camps in Bangladesh, where the virus could spread with devastating speed.
  • Domestic violence has risen since stay-at-home orders began, and many shelters have stopped accepting newcomers because of virus fears.
  • Mumbai has endured the worst of the virus’s impact in India, with nearly a quarter of the country’s deaths.

At noon Pacific Time there were 1,470,688 cases in the United States, with 317,614 recoveries and 87,773 deaths. Worldwide there were 4,593,434 cases, with 1,738,166 recoveries and 306,377 deaths.

May 14, 2020

COVID-19 claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 137. Oregon Health Authority reported 67 new confirmed cases, bringing the state total to 3,479. The new confirmed cases were in the following counties: Deschutes (2), Linn (2), Malheur (1), Marion (33), Multnomah (19), Polk (1), Umatilla (2), Washington (2), Yamhill (5).

Oregon’s 135th death was a 66-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive April 11 and died May 13 at Kaiser Permanente Westside Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 136th death was a 61-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive April 22 and died May 12 at Oregon Health & Science University. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 137th death was a 66-year-old man in Washington County, who tested positive March 29 and died May 4 at Providence St Vincent’s Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Note: During routine data reconciliation, the following changes were identified:

  • Due to positive tests, eight cases were recategorized as confirmed cases.
  • It was determined that a new case reported in Josephine County May 12 should have been reported May 6.
  • A confirmed case originally reported as a Clackamas County case was later determined not to be a case. It was subtracted from Wednesday’s state total, and the total number of cases in Clackamas County was reduced by one to reflect this change.
  • A presumptive case originally reported as a Multnomah County case was later determined not to be a case. It was subtracted from Wednesday’s state total, and the total number of cases in Multnomah County was reduced by one to reflect this change.
  • A case that was recorded as transferred out of Coos County was indeed a Coos County case.

The New York Times daily briefing offered this insight:

When the coronavirus lockdowns began almost two months ago, the outdoors seemed like a scary place. It was where you could get infected by a neighbor, jogger, public bench, doorknob or any number of other things. The better move, as a popular hashtag put it, was to #StayHome.

As more virus research has emerged, however, the outdoors has begun to look safer. It still brings risks (like those doorknobs). But they are fairly small. One study of 1,245 coronavirus cases across China found that only two came from outdoors transmission.

Beside the research, something else has also begun to make outdoors seem more attractive. People have started to go stir crazy.

This combination is leading to a surge of new expert advice that might be boiled down to: Get out.

At 12:30 p.m. Pacific Time, there were 1,443,554 cases in the United States, with 312,513 recoveries and 86,227 deaths. Worldwide there were 4,494,377 cases, with 1,691,494 recoveries and 301,750 deaths.

May 13, 2020

The New York Times daily briefing reported: The news about the coronavirus really has gotten better over the past week. There have been fewer than 200 deaths in New York for two consecutive days, down from more than 1,000 in early April. Nationwide, the number of confirmed new cases each day has finally begun to decline substantially.

It also provided other newsworthy developments:

  • Last week, the share of Americans staying home fell to 36 percent, down from 44 percent a few weeks ago, as a Times graphic shows.
  • California State University, the nation’s largest four-year public university system, canceled in-person classes for the fall.
  • The virus came late to Latin America, but death rates there are now comparable to those in Europe.
  • Uber is seeking to acquire Grubhub, a deal that would unite two large players in food delivery as more people order in meals during the pandemic.
  • Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law and adviser, refused to rule out postponing the November election — a power he does not seem to have.
  • About 200 goats escaped through a fence and roamed the streets of San Jose, Calif.

The Oregon Health Authority reported four new deaths linked to the novel coronavirus as cases climbed to 3,416.

The state’s COVID-19 death toll stands at 134. Three Polk County residents — two women, ages 90 and 100, and a 91-year-old man — as well as a 91-year-old Washington County woman were the latest patients to succumb to the illness.

In the previous 24 hours, state health officials also reported 55 new confirmed and four presumptive cases. They were linked to 11 of Oregon’s 36 counties: Clatsop (3), Columbia (1), Coos (1), Hood River (1), Linn (1), Malheur (1), Marion (23), Multnomah (13), Polk (1), Umatilla (1), Washington (13).

Multnomah, Marion, Washington, Clackamas and Linn counties are the only ones that have reported 100 coronavirus cases or more.

Three counties still have yet to document a single coronavirus case — Gilliam, Lake and Wheeler — all located in the central and eastern parts of the state with a combined population of about 11,000.

Here’s the overall case count by county: Baker (1), Benton (50), Clackamas (274), Clatsop (37), Columbia (16), Coos (30), Crook (1), Curry (4), Deschutes (89), Douglas (24), Grant (1), Harney (1), Hood River, (14), Jackson (50), Jefferson (24), Josephine (25), Klamath (41), Lane (61), Lincoln (6), Linn (105), Malheur (15), Marion (746), Morrow (12), Multnomah (921), Polk (90), Sherman (1), Tillamook (6), Umatilla (86), Union (4), Wallowa (1), Wasco (16), Washington (614) and Yamhill (50).

Those totals represent 3,338 residents with positive tests and an additional 78 who are presumed to have the virus.

The virus has killed 134 people from 12 counties: 53 people from Multnomah, 23 from Marion, 14 from Washington, nine from Clackamas, nine from Polk, eight from Linn, seven from Yamhill, five from Benton, two from Lane, two from Umatilla, one each from Josephine and Wasco.

Their ages ranged from 41 to 100. Three people who died were in their 40s and four were in their 50s. The rest — 95 percent — were 60 or older.

At noon Pacific Time there were 1,419,048 cases in the United States, with 300,439 recoveries and 84,243 deaths. Worldwide there were 4,397,546 cases, with 1,639,050 recoveries and 295,971 deaths.

May 12, 2020

Klamath County announced a presumptive case of COVID-19 in the community, bringing the total to 41. Going forward, Klamath County’s total cases will include both confirmed and presumptive numbers. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. 

Oregon Health Authority reported 61 new confirmed cases and 11 new presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 3,358. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases were in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (6), Clatsop (1), Deschutes (4), Jackson (1), Josephine (1), Klamath (1), Linn (1), Marion (29), Multnomah (9), Polk (2), Wasco (1), Washington (14), Yamhill (1).

The top story in The New York Times daily briefing brought attention to future waves of COVID-19. While Germany was on lockdown last month, each person there with the coronavirus was infecting fewer than one other person on average. Now, that number — known as “R factor” and closely tracked by scientists — has risen to about 1.1. It’s a worrisome change, experts say.

More flare-ups like Germany’s are expected, as the world moves toward reopening. As The Times’s Donald McNeil writes in his latest overview of the virus in the U.S., “The much-feared ‘second wave’ of infection may not wait until fall, many scientists say, and instead may become a storm of wavelets breaking unpredictably across the country.”

At 12:30 p.m. Pacific Time there were 1,396,184 cases in the United States, with 274,902 recoveries and 82,791 deaths. Worldwide there were 4,318,202 cases, with 1,569,469 recoveries and 291,356 deaths.

May 11, 2020

Global recoveries exceeded 1.5 million. Klamath County reported a new case, bringing the count to 40 with 33 recoveries. There were three more deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 130. The Oregon Health Authority also reported 51 new confirmed and seven new presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 3,286. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (2), Clatsop (4), Klamath (1), Linn (1), Marion (17), Multnomah (14), Polk (3), Washington (14).

Oregon’s 128th death was a 91-year-old man in Polk County, who tested positive May 2 and died May 10 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 129th death was a 64-year-old man in Umatilla County, who tested positive April 29 and died May 9 at Providence St. Mary Medical Center, Walla Walla. It is unknown at this time if he had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 130th death was a 77-year-old woman in Washington County, who tested positive May 3 and died May 9 at OHSU Hillsboro Medical Center. She had no known underlying medical conditions.

Note: The number of hospitalizations in the 10-19 age group dropped by one. During routine data reconciliation, a person was determined not to have been hospitalized during their COVID-19 illness.

Oregon’s 120th death was previously reported incorrectly. The 120th death was a 58-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive May 3 and died May 8 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

The New York Times reported, the coronavirus reached the cramped offices of the White House, with two staff members having tested positive. Three top health officials began to quarantine themselves over the weekend, including Dr. Anthony Fauci, who said he had contact with an infected staff member.

At noon Pacific Time there were 1,376,849 cases in the United States, with 258,419 recoveries and 81,182 deaths. Globally, there were 4,233,997 cases, with 1,518,111 recoveries and 285,899 deaths.

May 10, 2020

In the Mother’s Day weekend briefing, The New York Times teased:

Five old high school friends in Washington State went to a happy hour and wound up buying a tulip farm. Their timing could not have been worse.

A delicate and colorful symbol of spring that for growers reaches a financial peak on Mother’s Day quickly became another victim of the pandemic. But within weeks, the power of friendship and innovation saved their enterprise.

In case you forgot to get Mom flowers, here are some other suggestions to make her happy: Have a socially distanced picnic, make ice cream in a Mason jar, or watch one of these flicks with unorthodox matriarchs. These recipes may help, as well.

Oregon Health Authority reported 60 new confirmed and eight new presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 3,228. The new confirmed and presumptive cases were in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (10), Clatsop (1), Deschutes (1), Hood River (1), Marion (14), Multnomah (22), Polk (2), Umatilla (1), Washington (11), Yamhill (2).

At 1:30 p.m. Pacific Time there were 1,363,126 cases in the United States, with 240,616 recoveries and 80,546 deaths. Worldwide there were 4,165,617 cases, with 1,467,374 recoveries and 283,023 deaths.

May 9, 2020

Results of a new survey of Oregon health care providers strongly suggest that immunizations in the state may have dropped dramatically due to the COVID-19 crisis.

Oregon Health Authority released the survey results this week. They show that changes to immunization practices many clinics put in place in response to the pandemic, as well as concerns among parents of young children, may have caused a "sharp reduction" in routine immunization of children and adults over the last two months.

The survey results are similar to those the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported today in its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. CDC researchers observed a "notable decrease in orders" for non-influenza childhood vaccines and measles vaccines since the March 13 declaration of a national emergency due to COVID-19.

The vaccines are funded by the federal Vaccines for Children (VFC) program, which provides vaccines at no cost to children who might not otherwise be vaccinated because of inability to pay. CDC buys vaccines at a discount and distributes them to grantees including OHA and some local health departments, which in turn distribute them at no charge to private physicians’ offices and public health clinics registered as VFC providers.

Officials with the Oregon Immunization Program, based at OHA, surveyed clinics that participate in VFC on April 18 and 29 after learning of concerns about clinic experience and operation changes due to the pandemic. The survey results found that among clinics that routinely provide immunizations to infants and children:

  • 95% reported changing their immunization practices.
  • 65% reduced or limited well-child visits, with 5% cancelling all well-child visits.
  • 50% reported cancelling or rescheduling immunizations that were due for older children and adolescents.
  • 81% reported difficulty maintaining staffing.

In addition, 58% of VFC clinics indicated they had a plan for contacting families of children with missed immunizations and catching them up, while 36% reported that they were still thinking about it. In open-ended responses, clinics frequently expressed a need for assistance in getting children to return for missed immunizations.

The survey was initiated after OHA officials noticed rapid declines in Oregon VFC vaccine orders; initial drops in weekly immunizations captured by Oregon’s ALERT IIS vaccination database; and reports from health care providers that parents stopped bringing their children in to clinics during the COVID-19 pandemic, and that providers were having difficulty maintaining clinic operations due to financial and staffing issues.

"There’s certainly been a lot of fear about COVID-19, and these survey results show us that this fear dramatically affected our ability to get children vaccinated," said Paul Cieslak, M.D., medical director for immunizations and communicable diseases at OHA. "It tells us we have a lot of work to do to get Oregon children back on schedule for getting protected from vaccine-preventable diseases."

There were three more deaths in Oregon, raising the toll to 127. Oregon Health Authority reported 79 new confirmed cases and 13 new presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 3,160. The new cases were in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (6), Clatsop (1), Coos (1), Deschutes (1), Hood River (1), Jefferson (2), Lane (1), Linn (2), Malheur (1), Marion (37), Multnomah (24), Polk (2), Umatilla (4), Washington (6), Yamhill (2).

Oregon’s 125th death was a 76-year-old woman in Clackamas County, who tested positive April 8 and died May 8 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 126th death was an 81-year-old man in Linn County, who tested positive April 19 and died May 2 at Samaritan Albany General Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 127th death was a 92-year-old woman in Polk County, who tested positive May 1 and died May 7 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

Note: The number of hospitalizations in the 30–39 age group dropped by one. During routine data reconciliation, a person was determined not to have been hospitalized during their COVID-19 illness.

At 1 p.m. Pacific Time there were 1,339,179 cases in the United States, with 225,348 recoveries and 79,619 deaths. Worldwide there were 4,077,817 cases, with 1,418,026 recoveries and 279,063 deaths.

May 8, 2020

The New York Times reported COVID-19 was hard hitting in the Latino community. The coronavirus was striking newer, less established Latino communities — like several in Oregon, Iowa and Washington — with particular force. In Iowa, for example, Latinos make up 6 percent of the population but more than 20 percent of reported coronavirus cases. African-Americans have also been hit disproportionately hard.

Oregon reported 75 new confirmed cases, 5 new presumptive cases and three new deaths. The death total became 124, while the case tally was 3,032. A total of 72,657 tests had been processed.

At 1:30 p.m. Pacific Time there were 1,314,295 cases in the United States, with 220,997 recoveries and 78,248 deaths. Worldwide there were 3,991,591 cases, with 1,374,132 recoveries and 274,966 deaths.

May 7, 2020

Six new deaths brought Oregon’s death toll to 121, the Oregon Health Authority reported. There were also 70 new confirmed cases and three new presumptive, bringing the state total to 2,989. The new confirmed and presumptive cases reported were in the following counties: Benton (4), Clackamas (6), Clatsop (1), Coos (1), Deschutes (2), Jefferson (4), Marion (21), Morrow (1), Multnomah (16), Polk (3), Washington (11), Yamhill (3).

The 116th death was an 84-year-old woman in Clackamas County, who tested positive April 28 and died May 6 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

The 117th COVID-19 death was a 62-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive April 16 and died May 5 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

The 118th COVID-19 death was an 82-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive April 22 and died May 3 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

The 119th death was an 80-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive April 22 and died May 5 at Portland VA Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

The 120th death was a 71-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive April 23 and died May 5 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

The 121st death was a 69-year-old woman in Polk County, who tested positive May 2 and died May 5 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Note: The number of hospitalizations in the 20-29, 30-39, and 40-49 age groups each dropped by one. During routine data reconciliation, these people were determined not to have been hospitalized during their COVID-19 illness.

At 1 p.m. Pacific Time there were 1,280,951 cases in the United States, with 214,844 recoveries and 76,290 deaths. Worldwide there were 3,806,174 cases, with 1,287,590 recoveries and 263,478 deaths.

Stories New York Times included:

  • At least seven people died and hundreds sickened after a gas leak from a chemical plant in eastern India.
  • Iraq’s new prime minister is Mustafa al-Kadhimi, a former intelligence chief with the support of both the U.S. and Iran.
  • An Indianapolis police officer shot and killed a man, in an encounter that appeared to have been captured on Facebook. In a separate case, a Georgia grand jury will decide whether to bring charges in the shooting of an unarmed black man pursued by two white men. (In Opinion, Charles Blow wrote about the Georgia case.)
  • Scientists have long turned to llamas for antibody research. A new study found the animals may be useful in neutralizing the coronavirus.

May 6, 2020

Two more lives Oregonians died, raising the state’s death toll to 115. Oregon Health Authority reported 70 new confirmed cases and seven new presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 2,916. The new confirmed and presumptive cases were in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (1), Clackamas (4), Columbia (1), Deschutes (1), Jefferson (4), Lane (2), Lincoln (1), Linn (1), Marion (18), Multnomah (24), Polk (7), Umatilla (4), Wasco (1), Washington (6), Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 114th death was an 88-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive April 30 and died May 2 at Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 115th death was a 95-year-old man in Polk County, who tested positive April 27 and died May 4 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

At 2:30 p.m. Pacific Time, the United States had 1,256,066 cases, with 205,215 recoveries and 74,093 deaths. Worldwide there were 3,806,174 cases, with 1,287,590 recoveries and 263,478 deaths.

Headlines in The New York Times included:

  • Trump contradicts his administration’s plans to shut down the coronavirus task force.
  • A deep recession and ballooning unemployment in Europe darken the global economic picture.
  • China assails the United States over Wuhan lab leak allegations.
  • Merkel says Germany has made progress as states take the lead on easing lockdowns.
  • China assails the U.S. over Wuhan lab leak allegations.
  • As India reopens, deaths jump sharply.
  • Who’s still getting sick? The aged and the unemployed.
  • Nightly subway closings have begun.
  • Social-distance rules may be quashing lawful protest.
  • Gap plans to open as many as 800 stores by the end of May.
  • G.M. plans to restart plants in May.

May 5, 2020

COVID-19 claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 113. Oregon Health Authority also reported 72 new confirmed cases and eight new presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 2,839. The new confirmed and presumptive cases reported were in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (5), Clatsop (9), Coos (1), Deschutes (1), Hood River (1), Josephine (2), Linn (1), Marion (13), Morrow (1), Multnomah (15), Polk (19), Umatilla (3), Washington (5), Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 110th death was an 89-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive April 14 and died May 2 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 111th death was a 72-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive April 7 and died May 2 at Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 112th death was a 71-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive April 24 and died May 2 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 113th death was a 76-year-old man in Washington County, who tested positive April 13 and died May 3 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. He had no known underlying medical conditions.

At 1 p.m. Pacific Time in the United States there were 1,229,919 cases, with 198,935 recoveries and 71,670 deaths. Worldwide there were 3,710,380 cases, with 1,235,477 recoveries and 256,920 deaths.

Headlines in The New York Times included:

  • The White House is considering winding down the coronavirus task force in the weeks to come.
  • An ousted federal scientist said he was pressured to steer contracts to clients of a well-connected consultant.
  • As outbreaks shutter meatpacking plants, meat gets scarcer in grocery aisles and drive-throughs.
  • The reality of the virus in the U.S. is an unrelenting crush of cases and deaths.
  • Trump arrives in Arizona on his first cross-country trip since the virus restrictions.
  • The special I.G. nominated to oversee a $500 billion fund vows to be impartial in combating misuse.
  • 2 New England men face first federal fraud charges related to small business loan program.

May 4, 2020

Oregon Health Authority reported 65 new confirmed cases and 14 new presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 2,759. The new confirmed and presumptive cases reported were in the following counties: Benton (4), Clackamas (1), Clatsop (1), Coos (2), Deschutes (1), Hood River (1), Jefferson (1), Lane (1), Linn (10), Marion (17), Multnomah (15), Polk (8), Umatilla (6), Washington (10), Yamhill (1).

Note: The state included presumptive COVID-19 cases in its daily reports, consistent with recently amended guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A presumptive case is someone who does not have a positive PCR test -- a “Polymerase Chain Reaction” that confirms if a person has COVID-19 -- but is showing symptoms and has had close contact with a confirmed case. If they later test positive by PCR, those will be recategorized as confirmed cases.

At noon Pacific Time in the United States there were 1,201,460 cases, with 181,603 recoveries and 69,143 deaths. Worldwide there were 3,621,594 cases, with 1,179,215 recoveries and 250,847 deaths.

Headlines in the New York Times included:

  • The Trump administration projects about 3,000 daily deaths by early June.
  • The Supreme Court heard the first arguments via phone.
  • Carnival, which was criticized after outbreaks at sea, plans to restart cruises before summer ends.
  • As daily deaths fall in New York, Cuomo outlines criteria for reopening.
  • The F.D.A. says companies selling antibody tests must prove accuracy within 10 days.
  • Intelligence officials back Trump’s assertion that they downplayed the virus threat in January.
  • Three hospital workers gave out masks. Weeks later, they all were dead.

May 3, 2020

Oregon Health Authority reported 45 new cases, bringing the state total to 2,680. The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (1), Coos (4), Hood River (2), Josephine (1), Malheur (1), Marion (21), Multnomah (5), Umatilla (3), Washington (7).

At noon Pacific Time the United States had 1,177,918 cases, with 177,705 recoveries and 68,173 deaths. Worldwide there were 3,545,170 cases, with 1,148,528 recoveries and 247,305 deaths.

Headlines in the New York Times included:

  • Experts worry that the coronavirus will go on spreading in a ‘slow burn’ in the U.S.
  • The White House wants to wait and see before considering more economic aid.
  • Seven Eastern states will join together to buy vital virus-fighting supplies and equipment.
  • Warmer weather and protests put pressure on states.
  • U.S. extremists are ‘capitalizing on the pandemic.’
  • Botox has returned to Beverly Hills.
  • Mike Pompeo says there is ‘enormous evidence’ tying the virus outbreak to a lab in China.

May 2, 2020

Oregon had five new deaths, raising the state’s death toll to 109. Oregon Health Authority reported 57 new cases, bringing the state total to 2,635. The new cases reported were in the following counties: Clackamas (2), Deschutes (2), Hood River (1), Jefferson (3), Lane (4), Malheur (2), Marion (15), Morrow (1), Multnomah (14), Umatilla (4), Washington (9).

Note: During routine data reconciliation, a case originally reported as a Polk County case was later determined not to be a case. It was subtracted from Friday’s state total, and the total number of cases in Polk County was reduced by one to reflect this change.

Oregon’s 105th death was a 64-year-old man from Polk County, who tested positive March 19 and died May 1 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 106th death was a 70-year-old man from Multnomah County, who tested positive April 20 and died May 1 at Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 107th death was a 75-year-old man from Multnomah County, who tested positive April 27 and died May 1 at Providence Milwaukie Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 108th death was a 91-year-old woman from Marion County, who tested positive April 22 and died April 30 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 109th death was a 76-year-old woman from Umatilla County, who tested positive April 14 and died April 30 at Kadlec Regional Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

At noon Pacific Time the United States had 1,147,358 cases, with 162,107 recoveries and 66,640 deaths. Worldwide there were 3,456,223 cases, with 1,102,552 recoveries and 243,024 deaths.

Headlines in the New York Times included:

  • Warmer weather lures people outdoors, and protests continue over restrictions.
  • ‘We had to do something’: Government will spend $300 million on surplus food.
  • The race for a vaccine is compressing a process of years into months.
  • A few Texas movie theaters reopened, early experiments in back-to-normal living.
  • Researchers in Norway have a suggestion for how U.S. schools might reopen.
  • A family faced the coronavirus, 2,500 miles apart.
  • Maryland cancels a big order of supplies.

May 1, 2020

Governor Kate Brown announced testing and contact tracing plans to help with reopening Oregon. Statewide testing will focus on people exhibiting symptoms, with emphasis placed on reducing barriers for vulnerable populations, including under-represented groups. Nationwide Native American, Black and Hispanic populations are showing higher rates of disease prevalence.

Part of the plan is a 12-month study led by Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) that will follow 100,000 randomly selected volunteers to determine where COVID-19 is appearing statewide.

The Oregon Health Authority reported one new death and confirmed cases climbed to 2,579. The 104th death was a 73-year-old Multnomah County man who had an underlying medical condition.

Additionally, state health officials said 69 residents — from Benton (2), Clackamas (8), Clatsop (1), Coos (1), Douglas (1), Josephine (1), Klamath (1), Linn (1), Malheur (2), Marion (17), Morrow (2), Multnomah (13), Polk (3), Umatilla (7) and Washington (9) counties — tested positive for the virus in the last 24 hours.

At 1 p.m. Pacific Time the United States had 1,119,253 cases, with 158,287 recoveries and 65,138 deaths. Worldwide there were 3,383,588 cases, with 1,072,915 recoveries and 238,593 deaths.

Headlines from The New York Times included:

  • Some governors face growing resistance as many businesses open their doors around the country.
  • The F.D.A. issues the expected authorization for emergency use of a new virus treatment.
  • The White House blocks Fauci from appearing before Congress.
  • New Jersey is now reporting more virus deaths than New York.
  • Michigan’s governor will ease some restrictions after armed protests and a tweet from Trump.
  • A nuclear power plant in Georgia has confirmed an outbreak involving 171 workers.
  • More than 4,000 workers in meatpacking plants have the virus, the C.D.C. says.

April 30, 2020

Klamath County reported two new cases, bringing the local total to 39, with 31 recoveries. There were two deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 103.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 64 new cases, bringing the state total to 2,510. The new cases were in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (8), Coos (5), Deschutes (1), Klamath (1), Linn (4), Malheur (1), Marion (17), Multnomah (11), Umatilla (5), Washington (10).

Oregon’s 102nd death was a 69-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive April 7 and died April 26 at Legacy Emanuel Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 103rd death was a 77-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive April 25 and died April 25 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

At 5 p.m. Pacific Time in the United States there were 1,094,464 cases, with 151,818 recoveries and 63,827 deaths. Worldwide there were 3,303,306 cases, with 1,038,440 recoveries and 233,791 deaths.

Headlines in the New York Times included:

  • As federal guidelines expire, some states press ahead to reopen, despite health warnings.
  • New Jersey is now reporting more new daily deaths than any other state.
  • Democrats assail McConnell for calling the Senate back; Trump says he wants to ‘pause’ on aid for states.
  • California will close some beaches before the weekend.
  • Nursing homes will face federal inspections and reporting requirements, Trump says.
  • Trump officials are said to have pushed spies to hunt for unproven links between the virus and a lab in Wuhan.
  • 3.8 million more workers filed for unemployment benefits last week. 

April 29, 2020

Two deaths brought Oregon’s death toll to 101. Oregon Health Authority also reported 61 new cases, bringing the state total to 2,446. The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (1), Hood River (1), Jefferson (4), Linn (1), Marion (18), Multnomah (19), Polk (1), Umatilla (8), Washington (7), Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 100th death was a 75-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 20 and died on April 22 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 101st death was a 71-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive April 11 and died April 20th at Adventist Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

At noon Pacific Time, in the United States there were 1,048,834 cases, with 144,352 recoveries and 60,495 deaths. Worldwide there were 3,188,596 cases, with 986,622 recoveries and 225,615 deaths.

Headlines in the New York Times included:

  • Grasping for good news as the death toll mounts, stocks rally on early reports that a drug shows promise.
  • ‘Operation Warp Speed’: Trump pushes for a vaccine, but experts fear rushing is risky.
  • Florida will begin reopening on Monday, but hard-hit regions will remain shut.
  • Louisiana lawmakers consider using their legislative authority to override the governor’s stay-at-home order.
  • Trump declared meatpacking plants ‘critical infrastructure,’ but it is unclear how they would stay open.
  • America’s growth streak is over: The economy shrank 4.8 percent, and the worst is yet to come.
  • A Massachusetts nursing home has had at least 68 deaths.

At 4:45 p.m. Pacific Time there had been 6,026,170 tests processed in the United States.

April 28, 2020

Klamath County reported a new case, bringing the total to 37 with 24 recoveries. COVID-19 claimed seven more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 92 to 99.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 31 new cases, bringing the state total to 2,385. The new cases reported were in the following counties: Clackamas (1), Coos (1), Harney (1), Klamath (1), Linn (2), Marion (9), Morrow (1), Multnomah (13), Umatilla (1), Wasco (1), Yamhill (1).

Note: A case originally reported as a Washington County case was later determined to be a Multnomah County case. The case count in Multnomah County includes the case to reflect this change. However, the case that moved from Washington County to Multnomah County is not reflected in the total of new cases statewide.

Oregon’s 93rd death was a 93-year-old woman in Clackamas County, who tested positive on April 17 and died on April 27 in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 94th death was a 73-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on March 30 and died on April 26 at Salem hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 95th death was a 92-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on April 20 and died on April 25 at Salem hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 96th death was a 93-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 17 and died on April 26 at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 97th death was a 69-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 17 and died on April 23 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 98th death was a 72-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 24 and died on April 26 at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 99th death was a 91-year-old man in Yamhill County, who tested positive on April 25 and died on April 26 at Providence Newberg Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

At noon Pacific Time, the United States had 1,022,259 cases, with 139,927 recoveries and 57,862 deaths. Worldwide there were 3,110,696 cases, with 944,595 recoveries and 215,231 deaths.

April 27, 2020

The Oregon Health Authority reported the state’s largest number of new coronavirus test results in a single day as the illness claimed one additional life and confirmed cases climbed to 2,354. The agency said a 91-year-old Washington County woman was the latest patient to die, bringing the statewide death toll to 92. The woman had an underlying medical condition.

Additionally, 43 residents — in Multnomah (12), Marion (11), Washington (9), Linn (5), Coos (2), Deschutes (2), Malheur (1) and Yamhill (1) counties — tested positive for the virus in the previous 24 hours.

During that time, over 2,200 new people received coronavirus test results. It is the first time test results in the state have surpassed 2,000 in a single day and is nearly 350 more that the previous high of 1,855, which occurred April 25.

More than 51,000 Oregonians have been tested for the illness since the state confirmed its first case on Feb. 28. Despite expanding capacity, coronavirus testing in Oregon and other states continues to be a limited, creating a dramatic undercount of known coronavirus cases nationwide.

Medical experts also now believe that many infected people don’t show symptoms of the illness.

At noon Pacific Time, the United States had 999,390 cases, with 137,271 recoveries and 56,175 deaths. Worldwide there were 3,044,584 cases, with 916,111 recoveries and 210,268 deaths.

April 26, 2020

Headlines in The New York Times included:

  • The virus poses a dire threat in overcrowded prisons, leading governments around the world to release inmates.
  • Italy’s prime minister details how the country will begin to ease Europe’s longest lockdown.
  • China says Wuhan has no more hospitalized coronavirus patients.
  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson has returned to Downing Street and will be at work on Monday.
  • Children in Spain go outside for the first time in weeks as the country’s lockdown begins to ease.
  • Two Dutch mink farms are quarantined after the animals are infected with the virus.
  • In North Korea, which has reported no coronavirus cases, rumors fly about the health of Kim Jong-un.

The Oregon Health Authority reported 58 new cases, bringing the total known case count to 2,311.Four new deaths brought the total number of deaths to 91. In all, 48,964 people were tested in Oregon. Of those, 46,653 tested negative for the disease. State officials report 24% of people who have tested positive for the virus in the state have been hospitalized at some point.

249 patients are hospitalized with known or suspected COVID-19. Of those, 71 are in intensive care and 31 are on ventilators. The state has 280 available adult ICU beds and 795 available ventilators.

At 1:30 p.m. Pacific Time in the United States there were 980,784 cases, with 118,735 recoveries and 55,094 deaths. Globally there were 2,982,647 cases, with 875,299 recoveries and 206,342 deaths.

April 25, 2020

Headlines in the New York Times included:

  • Some states are moving to reopen. But the path ahead is far from simple.
  • Trump amplifies drugs and disinfectants as treatments, even as experts push back.
  • The U.S. conducted 1.2 million tests in a week, but experts say that is not enough.
  • Global
  • Americans abroad are asking themselves whether to risk infection by staying put, or risk infection by returning.
  • ‘There are no viruses here’: The leader of Belarus scoffs at lockdowns.
  • The Metropolitan Opera put on a live concert gala  with a worldwide relay of performances via smartphones.

Oregon officials reported one new death and 76 new cases -- bringing the total number of deaths to 87 and known cases to 2,253. The Oregon Health Authority reported that the latest death was in Lane County, but details about that person weren’t immediately available.

At 2 p.m. Pacific Time the United States had 952,995 cases, with 116,015 recoveries and 53,745 deaths. Worldwide there were 2,908,206 cases, with 832,211 recoveries and 202,501 deaths.

April 24, 2020

The Oregon Health Authority reported three new deaths as confirmed cases climbed to 2,177. The agency said two Multnomah County men, ages 80 and 86, and an 89-year-old Linn County man were the latest known patients to succumb to the illness, bringing the statewide death toll to 86. Each had an underlying medical condition.

In addition, 51 residents — in Clackamas (5), Lane (2), Marion (20), Multnomah (14), Umatilla (2), Washington (8) counties — tested positive for the virus in the previous 24 hours.

At 1 p.m. Pacific Time the United States had 894,034 cases, with 90,187 recoveries and 50,919 deaths. Worldwide there were 2,662,118 cases, with 740,620 recoveries and 183,770 deaths.

April 23, 2020

Klamath County reported three new cases, bringing the total count to 36, of which 23 had recovered. The Oregon Health Authority reported five new deaths as confirmed cases climbed to 2,127.

The agency said four people in Multnomah County — a 94-year-old woman and three men ages, 74, 78 and 87 — as well as a 70-year-old Clackamas County man were the latest known patients to succumb to the illness, bringing the statewide death toll to 83. Each had an underlying medical condition.

In addition, state health officials said 68 residents — in Clackamas (8), Coos (1), Deschutes (4), Douglas (1), Hood River (1), Klamath (3), Linn (4), Malheur (1), Marion (9), Multnomah (16), Umatilla (1), Wasco (1), Washington (18) counties — tested positive for the virus in the previous 24 hours.

Nearly 44,000 Oregonians had been tested for the illness since the state confirmed its first case on Feb. 28.

Headlines from the New York Times included:

  • As states face a downturn worse than the Great Recession, McConnell suggests they consider bankruptcy.   
  • The House convenes for votes on a $484 billion aid plan and the formation of a special oversight committee.
  • 4.4 million more workers file for unemployment.
  • Florida’s unemployment system falters, leaving hundreds of thousands unpaid.
  • A remdesivir drug trial was terminated because of a lack of patients, contrary to initial reports.
  • A lawmaker says she wants to hold hearings on the ouster of a key health official.
  • After Trump’s rebuke, Georgia’s governor signals he will stick with reopening plans.

At noon Pacific Time the United States had 851,586 cases, with 84,117 recoveries and 47,808 deaths. Worldwide there were 2,662,118 cases, with 740,620 recoveries and 183,770 deaths.

April 22, 2020

Oregon Health Authority reported 57 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 2,059. The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (10), Coos (1), Deschutes (2), Jefferson (1), Linn (1), Marion (7), Multnomah (24), Washington (10) and Yamhill (1).

At noon Pacific Time the United States had 830,544 cases, with 83,420 recoveries and 46,149 recoveries. Worldwide there were 2,606,902 cases, with 723,850 recoveries and 180,301 deaths.

April 21, 2020

COVID-19 claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 78.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 46 new cases, bringing the state total to 2,002. The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (2), Coos (1), Klamath (2) [Klamath announced these on April 20], Linn (1), Marion (10), Multnomah (22), Umatilla (2), Wasco (1), and Washington (7).

After receiving updated residency information, Benton and Yamhill Counties both transferred cases to other Oregon counties yesterday. This led to an overall increase of 46 new cases statewide, and an increase of 48 new cases for the counties.

Oregon’s 76th death was a 47-year-old man in Washington County, who tested positive on March 16 and died on April 17 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 77th death was a 61-year-old woman in Washington County, who tested positive on March 24 and died on April 18 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 78th death was a 65-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive and died on April 20 at Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

At 9 p.m. Pacific Time, the United States had  cases, 765,913, with 71,012 recoveries and 41,124 deaths. Worldwide there were 2,415,875 cases, with 634,929 recoveries and 166,086 deaths.

April 20, 2020

Klamath County reports three new cases. COVID-19 claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 75. Oregon Health Authority reported 47 new cases, bringing the state total to 1,956. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (10), Douglas (1), Klamath (1) [Klamath County reported two cases that had not yet reached the Oregon database], Lincoln (1), Linn (2), Marion (13), Multnomah (6), Polk (1), Umatilla (1), Washington (9), and Yamhill (1).

A case previously reported in Jackson County was transferred out of state during routine data reconciliation, reducing the cumulative statewide cases by one.

Oregon’s 75th death was a 45-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on April 14 and died on April 18 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Headlines in the New York Times included:

  • Cases surge in an Ohio prison, making it the top known U.S. hot spot.
  • The outbreak is continuing to worsen in some parts of the U.S.
  • The outbreak’s collateral damage includes people whose other illnesses go untreated.
  • Oil plummets as storage capacity runs low, and a quirk in pricing wipes out one benchmark.
  • A W.H.O. director warns that manufacturing and distributing a vaccine could be difficult.
  • Cuomo says 478 more people died in New York, the lowest single-day toll in two weeks.
  • Small demonstrations continue to protest stay-at-home orders, despite health warnings.

At 11 a.m. Pacific Time in the United States there were 771,197 cases, with 71,489 recoveries and 41,356 deaths. There have been 3,893,815 tests given. Worldwide there were 2,451,879 cases with 650,087 recoveries and 168,371 deaths.   

April 19, 2020

COVID-19 claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 72 to 74. The Oregon Health Authority also reported 66 new cases, bringing the state total to 1,910. The new reported were in the following counties: Clackamas (7), Deschutes (1), Lane (2), Marion (23), Multnomah (21), Umatilla (1), and Washington (12).

A previously reported Klamath County case was determined to be a Washington State case, reducing today’s number of new cases by 1 to 66. The total number of cases in Klamath County is 30 to reflect this change.

Oregon’s 73rd death was a 64-year-old man in Benton County, who tested positive on March 26 and died on April 18 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 74th death was a 68-year-old man in Washington County, who tested positive on March 23 and died on April 11 at OHSU. He had underlying medical conditions.

At 1:30 p.m. Pacific Time the United States had 759,134 cases, with 69,927 recoveries and 40,265 deaths. Worldwide there were 2,404,077 cases, with 625,280 recoveries and 164,740 deaths.

April 18, 2020

Klamath County announced another case, bringing the total to 30. However, Oregon Health Authority announced two new cases in the county. The second case was tested in Washington state and transferred to Oregon April 17 based information that the individual was a resident of Klamath County. Investigation completed by KCPH determined the Klamath County residence to be a past address. The individual now resides in Washington State.

COVID-19 claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 70 to 72. Oregon Health Authority also reported 59 new cases, bringing the state total to 1,844. The new COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Clackamas (1), Curry (1), Deschutes (2), Jackson (1), Klamath (2), Linn (2), Marion (18), Multnomah (26), Polk (1), Umatilla (2), and Washington (4).

A case originally reported as a Yamhill County case was later determined to be a Polk County case. The total number of new cases in Polk County is 1 to reflect this change. However, the case that moved from Yamhill County to Polk County is not reflected in the total of new cases statewide for today.

Oregon’s 71st death was a 62-year-old man in Clackamas County, who tested positive on April 2 and died on April 16 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 72nd death was an 84-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on April 2 and died on April 17 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

New York Times headlines included:

  • Contamination at C.D.C. labs resulted in delayed coronavirus tests.
  • Providing dialysis to Covid-19 patients is the latest unforeseen challenge taxing hospitals.
  • Jacksonville beaches reopen, but Florida schools will remained closed.
  • President Trump’s relationship with China’s leader complicates Republican electoral efforts.
  • One in three jobs held by women is essential, putting them on the pandemic’s front lines.
  • Pence resumes travel, giving the Air Force Academy’s commencement address.
  • Researchers say testing needs to triple for the U.S. to reopen safely, as Cuomo says testing is critical.

At 6:30 p.m. Pacific Time the United States had 675,640 cases, with 1,868 recoveries and 34,522 deaths. A total of 3,394,173 tests had been processed. Worldwide there 2,178,149 cases, with 546,743 recoveries and 145,329 deaths. A total of 18,161,936 tests had been processed.

April 17, 2020

COVID-19 claimed six more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 70. Oregon Health Authority also reported 49 new cases, bringing the state total to 1,785. The new cases were in the following counties: Clackamas (3), Deschutes (2), Jackson (1), Lane (1), Linn (3), Marion (8), Multnomah (19), Polk (1), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (1), Washington (7), and Yamhill (2) . 

Oregon’s 65th death was an 88-year-old woman in Clackamas County, who tested positive on April 15 and died April 16 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 66th death was a 95-year-old man in Linn County, who tested positive on April 2 and died April 14 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 67th death was an 86-year-old man in Linn County, who tested positive on April 6 and died April 15 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 68th death was a 65-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on March 26 and died April 6 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 69th death was a 91-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on April 12 and died April 16 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 70th death was a 76-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 7 and died April 11 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

New York Times headlines included:

  • Trump and Cuomo spar over the federal response to the outbreak.
  • Governors in Texas, Michigan, Wisconsin, Idaho and other states are looking to ease restrictions, despite inadequate testing.
  • The lack of testing presents a serious challenge to reopening, health experts say.
  • Doctors are prescribing hydroxychloroquine, but don’t know if it works.
  • With social distancing difficult on ships, the crew of the Mercy, a Navy hospital, moves ashore.
  • Small Business Administration loans have so far flowed heavily to California and Texas.

At noon Pacific Time the United States had 675,640 cases, with 1,868 recoveries and 34,522 deaths. There had been 3,394,173 tests processed. Worldwide there were 2,178,149 cases, with 546,743 recoveries and 145,329 deaths. A total of 18,161,936 tests had been processed.

April 16, 2020

Klamath County reported three new cases and 19 recoveries. COVID-19 claimed six more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 64. Oregon Health Authority also reported 73 new cases, bringing the state total to 1,736. The new cases were in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (8), Deschutes (4), Douglas (2), Klamath (3), Lane (1), Linn (1), Malheur (1), Marion (15), Multnomah (18), Umatilla (5), Washington (12), and Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 59th death was an 84-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 24 and died on April 13 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 60th death was a 56-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 28 and died on April 14 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 61st death was a 78-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 30 and died on April 14 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 62nd death was a 69-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 13 and died on April 15 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 63rd death was a 74-year-old woman in Benton County, who tested positive on April 2 and died on April 14 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 64th death was a 92-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on April 14 and died on April 11 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

At 5 p.m. Pacific Time the United States had 675,640 cases, with 1,868 recoveries and 34,522 deaths. A total of 3,394,173 tests have been processed. Worldwide there were 2,178,149 cases, with 546,743 recoveries and 145,329 deaths. There have been a total of 18,161,936 tests processed.

April 15, 2020

The World Health Organization Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said at a media briefing:

"COVID-19 does not discriminate between rich nations and poor, large nations and small. It does not discriminate between nationalities, ethnicities or ideologies.

"Neither do we. This is a time for all of us to be united in our common struggle against a common threat – a dangerous enemy.

"When we are divided, the virus exploits the cracks between us.

"We are committed to serving the world’s people, and to accountability for the resources with which we are entrusted.

"In due course, WHO’s performance in tackling this pandemic will be reviewed by WHO’s Member States and the independent bodies that are in place to ensure transparency and accountability. This is part of the usual process put in place by our Member States.

"No doubt, areas for improvement will be identified and there will be lessons for all of us to learn.

"But for now, our focus – my focus – is on stopping this virus and saving lives."

COVID-19 claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 58. Oregon Health Authority also reported 33 new cases, bringing the state total to 1,663. The new cases reported were in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (7), Columbia (3), Douglas (1), Lane (2), Linn (1), Marin (5), Multnomah (10), Umatilla (1), and Washington (2).

Three cases previously reported in Washington County were reclassified during routine data reconciliation. Two of the cases were removed and one was transferred to Washington state after residency was confirmed. These modifications reduce the cumulative statewide total by three.

Oregon’s 56th death was an 82-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on April 3 and died on April 10 at Santiam Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 57th death was an 84-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 30 and died on April 12 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 58th death was a 92-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 9 and died on April 12 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

The United States had 644,089 cases, with 48,701 recoveries and 28,529 deaths. Worldwide there were 2,082,372 cases, with 510,046 recoveries and 134,560 deaths.

April 14, 2020

Klamath County reported a new case and 15 recoveries, bringing the total to 26.

At 10:30 a.m. Pacific Time in the United States there were 602,977 cases, with 32,469 recoveries and 25,132 deaths. Worldwide there were 1,981,510 cases, with 459,169 recoveries and 125,011 deaths.      

April 13, 2020

COVID-19 claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 53. Oregon Health Authority also reported 57 new cases, bringing the state total to 1,584. The new cases reported were in the following counties: Clackamas (7), Columbia (2), Douglas (2), Jackson (1), Josephine (1), Lane (4), Marion (4), Multnomah (24), and Washington (12).

Oregon’s 53rd death was a 66-year-old Washington County resident, who tested positive on March 30 and died on April 12 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

At 12:30 p.m. Pacific Time the United States had 579,486 cases, with 31,336 recoveries and 23,252 deaths. Worldwide there were 1,915,952 cases, with 444,694 recoveries and 118,829 deaths.

Top stories in the New York Times were the governors of California, Oregon and Washington will work together on a joint approach to reopen their economies. The move came after a similar announcement by the governors of six East Coast states, including New York and Pennsylvania.   

  • Business leaders and the C.D.C. warn the economy will recover slowly, even as pressure grows to reopen it.
  • A major meat plant is closing indefinitely and a chief executive warns about supply chain.
  • A stalemate in Congress over interim emergency aid seems likely to continue.
  • Trump has no intention to fire Fauci, White House says.
  • Tornadoes that have killed at least 19 people add to the woes of the South as it grapples with the virus.
  • Facing testing backlogs, sick patients wait all night in their cars at drive-through sites. Then they wait more.

April 12, 2020

Headlines in the New York Times were:

  • Oil-producing nations agree to cut production sharply.
  • Questions loom about reopening the economy: ‘You can’t just pick a date and flip a switch.’
  • Easter was celebrated mostly at a distance. But some pastors resisted.
  • Walt Disney World will furlough 43,000 workers.
  • The outbreak in New York may be leveling off, but at a high level.
  • Should the U.S. rescue Boeing?
  • Behind the president’s delayed response to the pandemic.

COVID-19 claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 51 to 52. Oregon Health Authority also reported 80 new cases, bringing the state total to 1527. The new COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (4), Deschutes (1), Douglas (2), Jackson (2), Josephine (1), Lane (2), Linn (1), Malheur (1), Marion (13), Multnomah (31), Umatilla (2), Wasco (1), and Washington (18).

Oregon’s fifty-second death was an 89-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 25 and died on March 25. She had underlying conditions.

At 3 p.m. Pacific Time in the United States there were 557,235 cases, with 29,979 recoveries and 21,956 deaths. Internationally, there were 1,850,778 cases, with 427,363 recoveries and 113,969 deaths.      

April 11, 2020

COVID-19 claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 48 to 51. Oregon Health Authority also reported 76 new cases, bringing the state total to 1,447. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (5), Coos (1), Deschutes (2), Klamath (1), Lane (1), Linn (2), Malheur (1), Marion (17), Multnomah (26), Polk (1), Umatilla (3), Union (1), Wasco (2), Washington (10), and Yamhill (2).

Oregon’s forty-ninth death was a 94-year-old woman in Yamhill County, who tested positive on March 31 and died on April 8 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s fiftieth death was a 93-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 9 and died on April 10 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s fifty-first death was an 81-year-old man in Josephine County, who tested positive on March 27 and died on April 10 at Rogue Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

At 3:30 p.m. Pacific Time in the United States there were 530,735 cases, with 29,675 recoveries and 20,467 deaths. Worldwide there were 1,778,955 cases, with 407,593 recoveries and 108,858 deaths.     

April 10, 2020

Global coronavirus deaths reached 100,000, and cases passed 1.6 million. Lockdowns were extended across much of the world heading into the Easter weekend. Russia’s outbreak gained momentum. Italy, with more than 147,000 known coronavirus cases and nearly 19,000 reported deaths, extended its lockdown measures until May 3.

New York Times headlines included:

  • Violence erupts over the distribution of food in Kenya.
  • Pakistani Muslims defied the government’s order not to congregate for prayers.
  • Paris’s archbishop holds a Good Friday service in the charred Cathedral of Notre-Dame.
  • South Korea presses ahead with parliamentary polls despite epidemic.
  • Britain’s pubs, where beer flowed during world wars, have all closed.

Klamath County had two new cases and 11 recoveries. The total cases were 25. COVID-19 claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 48.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 51 new cases, bringing the state total to 1,371. The new COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Clackamas (7), Clatsop (1), Deschutes (1), Hood River (1), Josephine (1), Klamath (4), Lane (1), Marion (11), Multnomah (15), and Washington (9).

A previously reported Yamhill County case was reclassified based on a revised laboratory result, reducing the cumulative statewide case count by 1.

Oregon’s 45th COVID-19 death was a 74-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 24 and died April 4 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 46th COVID-19 death was an 81-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 30 and died April 5 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 47th COVID-19 death was a 69-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 2 and died April 9 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 48th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 3 and died April 7 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

At noon Pacific Time in the United States there were 491,122 cases, with 27,468 recoveries and deaths 18,195. Worldwide there were 1,686,488 cases, with 378,649 recoveries and 102,104 deaths.   

April 9, 2020

Klamath County reported one new case, bringing the total to 23, with 14 active cases and 9 recoveries.

COVID-19 claimed six more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 44. Oregon Health Authority also reported 83 new cases, bringing the state total to 1,321. The new COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Clackamas (6), Columbia (1), Curry (1), Deschutes (5), Jackson (4), Klamath (1), Lane (2), Linn (3), Marion (17), Morrow (2), Multnomah (16), Polk (1), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (3), Washington (16), and Yamhill (4).

A previously reported Wallowa County case was identified as a Washington State resident, reducing the Wallowa County case total and the statewide case count by 1.

Oregon’s 39th death was a 74-year-old man in Linn County, who tested positive on March 22 and died on April 3 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 40th death was a 97-year-old man in Linn County, who tested positive on March 15 and died on April 4 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 41st death was an 87-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 28 and died on April 6 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 42nd death was a 41-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 5 and died on April 8 at Oregon Health and Sciences University. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 43rd death was a 66-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 31 and died on April 5 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 44th death was a 74-year-old man in Benton County, who tested positive on March 26 and died on April 8 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center in Corvallis. He had underlying medical conditions.

At 2:30 p.m. Pacific Time, the United States had 462,180 cases, with 26,589 recoveries and 16,444 deaths. Worldwide there were 1,593,137 cases, with 355,561 recoveries and 95,026 deaths. 

April 8, 2020

COVID-19  claimed five more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 38.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 58 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 1,239. The new cases reported were in the following counties: Clackamas (6), Columbia (1), Deschutes (1), Hood River (1), Lane (1), Linn (1), Marion (3), Morrow (1), Multnomah (28), Wallowa (2), and Washington (13). To see more case and county-level data, 

Oregon’s 34th COVID-19 death was an 88-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 28 and died on April 6 at OHSU Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 35th death was a 77-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 27 and died April 1 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 36th death was a 75-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 6 and died April 7 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 37th death was a 94-year-old man in Yamhill County, who tested positive on March 25 and died April 7 at Providence Newberg Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 38th death was a 90-year-old man in Yamhill County, who tested positive on March 25 and died April 7 at Providence Newberg Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

At 5 p.m. Pacific Time the United States had 432,244 cases, with 25,722 recoveries and 14,722 deaths. Worldwide the case count was 1,516,800, with 338,369 recoveries and 88,386 deaths.   

April 7, 2020

Klamath County had one new COVID-19 case, bringing the total to 22. COVID-19 claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 33.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 49 new cases, bringing the state total to 1,181. The new COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Clackamas (7), Clatsop (1), Deschutes (4), Klamath (1), Lane (1), Linn (1), Marion (6), Multnomah (15), Polk (2), Washington (11). 

Oregon’s 30th death was an 83-year-old female in Marion County, who tested positive on March 28 and died on April 5 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 31st death was a 98-year-old female in Marion County, who tested positive on April 1 and died April 5 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 32nd death was a 71-year-old female in Marion County, who tested positive on March 30 and died April 2 in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 33rd death was a 91-year-old female in Washington County, who tested positive on March 27 and died April 6 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

At 3 p.m. Pacific Time there were 396,223 cases in the United States, with 20,328 recoveries and 12,716 deaths. Worldwide there were 1,427,089 cases, with 303,385 recoveries and 81,859 deaths.

April 6, 2020

Klamath County reported six more cases of COVID-19, bringing the count to 21. The county announced cases as laboratory results are available, which is often a different number than reported by the Oregon Health Authority.

COVID-19 claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 29. Oregon Health Authority also reported 64 new cases of COVID-19. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (6), Columbia (2), Curry (2), Deschutes (1), Douglas (1), Jackson (6), Josephine (3), Klamath (3), Lane (2), Linn (1), Marion (11), Multnomah (10), Polk (2), Umatilla (1), Washington (12).

Oregon’s 28th COVID-19 death was a 93-year-old male in Washington County, who tested positive on March 30 and died April 4, at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 29th COVID-19 death was a 70-year-old female in Marion county, who tested positive on April 1 and died April 2, at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

At 11 a.m. Pacific Time the United States had 356,007 cases, with 15,921 recoveries and 10,467 deaths. Worldwide there were 1,329,574 cases, with 274,804 recoveries and 73,758 deaths.

April 5, 2020

Klamath County reported its fifteenth case of COVID-19. One individual locally had recovered from the virus to date.

COVID-19 claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 26 to 27. Oregon Health Authority also reported 69 new cases in the following counties: Clackamas (6), Columbia (3), Klamath (1), Lane (3), Linn (2), Marion (10), Multnomah (24), Polk (2), Sherman (1), Umatilla (2), Washington (12), Yamhill (3). .

Oregon’s 27th COVID-19 death was a 62-year-old female in Multnomah County, who tested positive and died on April 2 at her residence. It is unknown if she had underlying medical conditions.

At 18:33 Greenwich Mean Time, the United States had 328,662 cases, with 16,700 recoveries and 9,361 deaths. At 11:30 a.m. Pacific Time, there were 1,254,288 worldwide cases, with 255,675 recoveries and 68,150 deaths.

April 4, 2020

COVID-19 claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 22 to 26.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 100 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the statewide total to 999. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (12), Columbia (2), Deschutes (3), Douglas (2), Jackson (6), Josephine (1), Klamath (1) [reported April 3], Lane (3), Linn (3), Marion (10), Multnomah (34), Polk (2), and Washington (19). 

Oregon’s 23rd COVID-19 death was a 65-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on March 26 and died on April 2 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 24th COVID-19 death was a 59-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 24 and died on April 3 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 25th COVID-19 death was a 77-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 30 and died on April 2 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 26th COVID-19 death was a 64-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 23 and died on April 1 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

At 5 p.m. Pacific Time there were 1,200,876 cases worldwide with 248,022 recoveries and 64,955 deaths. At 23:42 Greenwich Mean Time there were 310,133 cases in the United States with 14,741 recoveries and 8,442 deaths.

April 3, 2020

Klamath County reported two new cases.

COVID-19 claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 22.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 73 new cases of COVID-19. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (5), Clatsop (1), Crook (1), Deschutes (4), Klamath (5) [some of these were reported April 2], Malheur (1), Marion (14), Morrow (1), Multnomah (15), Polk (2), Washington (17), Yamhill (5). 

Oregon’s 22nd COVID-19 death was a 71-year-old man in Polk County, who tested positive on March 19 and died April 2 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Worldwide there were 1,116,662 cases with 228,589 recoveries and 59,174 deaths. There were 277,161 cases in the United States with 7,404 deaths.

April 2, 2020

Klamath County Public Health announced seven new cases of COVID-19 in the county. The county’s total cases number 12, with one recovery and 11 active cases. The statewide total was 826. Overall, 16,085 have been tested.

COVID-19 claimed 2 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 19 to 21.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 90 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the statewide total to 826. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (5), Deschutes (5), Hood River (1), Jackson (5), Josephine (2), Klamath (3) [the county announced 7 new cases above, as lab results became available], Lane (3), Lincoln (1), Marion (13), Union (2), Multnomah (26), Washington (22), and Yamhill (1). 

Oregon’s twentieth COVID-19 death was a 61-year-old man in Washington County, who tested positive on March 21 and died on April 1 at Tuality Healthcare. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s twenty-first COVID-19 death was a 91-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on March 31 and died on April 1 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

At noon Pacific Time, the global count was 1,008,038 cases, 206,870 recoveries and 52,486 deaths. At 20:51 Greenwich Mean Time, the United States had 240,395 total cases, with 10,365 recoveries and 5,808 deaths. 

April 1, 2020

COVID-19 claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 19. Oregon Health Authority also reported 47 new cases of COVID-19. The new COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (6), Deschutes (3), Douglas (1), Jackson (1), Lane (2), Lincoln (1), Marion (10), Multnomah (18), Washington (3), and Yamhill (1). One case previously reported in Hood River County was identified as a resident of another state; thus, today’s statewide case count is 736. 

Oregon’s nineteenth COVID-19 death was a 70-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 27 and died on March 29 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

At 21:42 Greenwich Mean Time the United States had 211,408 cases, 8,805 recoveries and 4,718 deaths. At 9 a.m. Pacific Time there were globally 891,487 cases, 185,942 recoveries and 44,232 deaths.

The Director-General of the World Health Organization said: 

"This is still a very new virus, and we are learning all the time.

"As the pandemic evolves, so does the evidence, and so does our advice.

"But what doesn’t change is WHO’s commitment to protecting the health of all people, based on the best science, without fear or favour.

"I thank you."

March 31, 2020

COVID-19 claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 16 to 18. Oregon Health Authority also reported 84 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 690. The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (10), Douglas (1), Hood River (1), Jackson (1), Klamath (1) [reported locally March 30], Lane (4), Lincoln (1), Linn (1), Malheur (1), Marion (18), Multnomah (16), Polk (3), Umatilla (1), Wallowa (1), Wasco (2), Washington (18), and Yamhill (2). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s seventeenth COVID-19 death was a 90-year-old man in Yamhill County, who tested positive on March 25 and died on March 29 at Providence Newberg Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s eighteenth COVID-19 death was an 88-year-old woman in Benton County, who tested positive on March 26 and died March 30 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center in Corvallis. She had underlying medical conditions.

At 10 a.m. Pacific time the global count was 722,924 cases, 156,383 recoveries and 33,867 deaths. At 17:18 Greenwich Mean Time there were 12,730 new cases and 290 new deaths in the United States.

March 30, 2020

Klamath County reported its fifth case. It was thought to be from spread in the community.

COVID-19 claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 16. Oregon Health Authority reported 58 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 606. The new COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (1), Deschutes (2), Douglas (4), Jackson (1), Josephine (4), Lane (2), Marion (14), Multnomah (9), Polk (2), Tillamook (1), Wasco (2), Washington (14), Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 14th COVID-19 death was a 91-year-old male in Yamhill County, who tested positive on March 20, and died March 29 at Providence Newberg Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 15th COVID-19 death was an 80-year-old male in Clackamas County, who tested positive on March 22, and died March 29 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 16th COVID-19 death was a 91-year-old male in Linn County, who tested positive on March 15, and died March 29 at the Oregon Veterans’ Home in Lebanon. He had underlying medical conditions.

There were 20,297 new cases and 558 new deaths in the United States. At 11 a.m. Pacific Time globally there were 764,062 cases, 164,813 recoveries and 36,956 deaths.

World Health Organization Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said:

"Yesterday I sent a tweet with a single word: humility. Some people asked me why.

"COVID-19 is reminding us how vulnerable we are, how connected we are and how dependent we are on each other.

"In the eye of a storm like COVID, scientific and public health tools are essential, but so are humility and kindness.

"With solidarity, humility and assuming the best of each other, we can – and will – overcome this together.

"I thank you."

March 29, 2020

Oregon Health Authority reported 69 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 548. No new deaths were reported.  The new COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Clackamas (3), Deschutes (3), Hood River (1), Jackson (11), Josephine (1), Klamath (2) [Klamath County reported its cases on March 28, when the test results became available], Lane (1), Linn (4), Marion (15), Multnomah (10), Polk (2), Tillamook (1), Wasco (1), Washington (14). 

The 93-year-old man whose death was reported March 28 had an underlying condition. 

There were 19,913 new cases and 363 new deaths in the United States. Global numbers at 2:30 p.m. Pacific Time were 722,924 cases, 156,383 recoveries and 33,867 deaths.

March 28, 2020

Klamath County reported two new cases of COVID-19. One was possibly the first community-spread case in the area.

COVID-19 claimed another life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 12 to 13. Oregon Health Authority also reported 65 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 479. The COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (5), Clatsop (1), Deschutes (2), Jackson (2), Josephine (1), Linn (4), Marion (11), Multnomah (14), Polk (1), Umatilla (1), Washington (18), Yamhill (2).

Oregon’s 13th COVID-19 death was a 93-year-old male in Yamhill County, who tested positive on March 18, and died March 27 at Providence Newberg Medical Center. He had no known underlying medical conditions.

There were 19,452 new cases and 525 new deaths in the United States. At 10:30 a.m. Pacific Time the global county was 644,417 cases, 143,496 recoveries and 29,905 deaths.

March 27, 2020

COVID-19 claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 12.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 98 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 414. The COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Clackamas (10), Columbia (1), Deschutes (3), Douglas (1), Jackson (2), Klamath (1), Lane (2), Linn (2), Marion (26), Morrow (1), Multnomah (22), Polk (4), Umatilla (1), Wasco (1), Washington (18), Yamhill (4). 

Oregon’s twelfth COVID-19 death was an 82-year-old woman in Marion County. She tested positive on March 20, and died March 25 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

There were 18,691 new cases and 400 new deaths in the United States. At 1:30 p.m. Pacific Time global numbers included 581,738 cases, 130,887 recoveries and 26,773 deaths.

March 26, 2020

Klamath County had its second confirmed case of COVID-19. It was announced ahead of its recording in the Oregon Health Authority’s daily report, as it was confirmed after the daily numbers were tallied at 8 a.m.

COVID-19 claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 10 to 11, the Oregon Health Authority reported.

OHA also reported 50 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 316. The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clatsop (1), Deschutes (5), Josephine (2), Lane (2), Linn (1), Marion (14), Multnomah (12), Polk (3), Tillamook (1), Wasco (1), and Washington (8). 

Oregon’s eleventh COVID-19 death was a 69-year-old woman in Washington County, who tested positive on March 15, and died March 25 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

There were 17,224 new cases and 268 new deaths in the United States. At 3:30 p.m. Pacific Time the global case count was 529,029 with 119,859 recoveries and 23,967 deaths.

March 25, 2020

COVID-19 claimed 2 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 8 to 10. Oregon Health Authority also reported 57 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 266. The COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (4), Douglas (2), Jackson (1), Josephine (1), Lane (1), Lincoln (1), Linn (5), Marion (11), Multnomah (8), Washington (20), Yamhill (1). 

Oregon’s ninth COVID-19 death was an 80-year-old woman in Clackamas County, who tested positive on March 23, and died March 24 at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s tenth COVID-19 death was a 73-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on March 22, and died March 23 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

There were 13,355 new cases and 247 new deaths in the United States. Total cases top 60,000.

March 24, 2020

COVID-19 claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to eight. Oregon Health Authority also reported 18 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 209. The COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Clackamas (3), Clatsop (1), Jackson (1), Marion (2), Multnomah (4), and Washington (7).

Oregon’s sixth COVID-19 death was a 78-year-old man in Clackamas County, who tested positive on March 15, and died March 22 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s seventh COVID-19 death was a 63-year-old man in Multnomah County, who had underlying medical conditions and was not hospitalized at the time of death. He tested positive on March 16, and died March 23.

Oregon’s eighth COVID-19 death was a 90-year-old woman in Washington County, who tested positive on March 19, and died March 23 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

There were 11,075 new cases and 225 new deaths in the United States. At 1 p.m.Pacific Time the global count was 416,248 confirmed cases, 18,652 deaths and 105,224 recoveries. 

March 23, 2020

Oregon Health Authority reported 30 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 191. The COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Clackamas (2), Hood River (1), Linn (1), Marion (8), Multnomah (2), Polk (2), Washington (14).

There were 10,189 new cases and 141 new deaths in the United States.

More than 300,000 cases of COVID-19 were reported to WHO, from almost every country in the world. The pandemic was accelerating. It took 67 days from the first reported case to reach the first 100,000 cases, 11 days for the second 100,000 cases and just 4 days for the third 100,000 cases. 

The 2 p.m. total for confirmed cases was 303,632, with 13,025 deaths and 93,615 recoveries. The other cases were still fighting the virus.

March 22, 2020

COVID-19 claimed another life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from four to five. The Oregon Health Authority also reported 24 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 161.

The COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (1), Deschutes (1), Lane (1), Marion (3), Multnomah (1), Washington (13) and Yamhill (2).

Oregon’s one COVID-19 death in Linn County was a veteran in his 90’s, who tested positive on March 11, and died March 23 at the Oregon Veterans Home. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon Health Authority and other officials also announced details about $4 million in state funding that is going out to Local Public Health Authorities (LPHA), Tribes and Native American Rehabilitation Association (NARA – the Urban Indian Health Program in Oregon) to support COVID-19 response. 

There were 9,400 new cases and 113 new deaths in the United States.

March 21, 2020

COVID-19 claimed another life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from three to four, the Oregon Health Authority reported. Oregon Health Authority also reported 23 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 137.

Oregon’s fourth COVID-19 death was a 72-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on March 15, and died March 20 at Kaiser Permanente Sunnyside Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

There were 4825 new cases and 46 new deaths in the United States. At 1:30 Pacific Time, there were 303,632 cases reported worldwide, resulting in 13,052 deaths and 93,615 recoveries. The balance of cases were still exhibiting symptoms.

March 20, 2020

The Oregon Health Authority, together with the Oregon Military Department, is assembed the Oregon Medical Station (OMS) at the Salem Fairgrounds. The OMS is a temporary mobile facility dedicated for emergency use in situations like the COVID-19 pandemic. The mobile facility will provide an alternate site for 250 patients currently in nursing home care.

There were 5,588 new cases and 49 new deaths in the United States. 23% of the US population is ordered to "stay at home" after governors in California (40 million residents), New York State (20 million), Illinois (13 million), and Connecticut (3.5 million) ordered nonessential workers to remain at home to slow the spread of coronavirus.

March 19, 2020

Oregon has 88 confirmed cases of COVID-19. There were 4,582 new cases and 56 new deaths in the United States.

March 18, 2020

Oregon Governor Kate Brown issued two new executive orders. One to preserve personal protective equipment by limiting use and another regarding institutions of higher education.

Click here to read the protective equipment news release

Click here to read the high education news release

There were 2,853 new cases and 40 new deaths in the United States. 

More than 200,000 cases of COVID-19 have been reported to the World Health Organization, and more than 8,000 people have lost their lives. More than 80% of all cases are from two regions – the Western Pacific and Europe.

These countries had more than 1,000 cases at noon:

  • China: 81,151 cases
  • Italy: 31,506 cases
  • Iran (Islamic Republic of): 16,169 cases
  • Spain: 11,178 cases
  • Republic of Korea: 8,413 cases
  • France: 7,652 cases
  • Germany: 7,156 cases
  • United States of America: 4,356 cases
  • Switzerland: 2,650 cases
  • The United Kingdom: 1,954 cases
  • Netherlands: 1,705 cases
  • Belgium: 1,486 cases
  • Austria: 1,471 cases
  • Norway: 1,423 cases
  • Sweden: 1,167 cases
  • Denmark: 1,044 cases

March 17, 2020

The Klamath County Board of Commissioners declared a state of emergency.

Click here to read the declaration

Oregon Governor Kate Brown extends her order for school closure to April 28.

Click here to read the news release

Statement to the press by Dr Hans Henri P. Kluge, WHO Regional Director for Europe

Copenhagen, Denmark, 17 March 2020

Ladies and gentlemen, we are holding this press briefing in an empty UN City building while staff work remotely as a social distancing measure in response to COVID-19.

The lives of millions of people in the WHO European Region are undergoing radical change. This is, quite simply, a new reality. The role of public health services is understood. The value of health workers is appreciated like never before.

Click here to read: Every country needs to take boldest actions to stop COVID-19

The popular St. Patrick’s Day parades in New York City and Boston were canceled — as they were in Dublin, where people were encouraged to celebrate the day online using the hashtag #StPatricksDayTogether. Many bars and pubs around the United States were closed before the holiday, shutting them down on what is traditionally one of their busiest days of the year.

Bus service in Detroit was halted after drivers, fearing for their safety, balked at leaving their garages. In North Carolina’s Outer Banks, some officials said they would establish checkpoints to turn away visitors. And Florida moved to ban beach groups of more than 10, after photos showed packed Gulf Coast beaches this week during Spring Break.

In France, the sanctuary in Lourdes, a major Catholic pilgrimage site that is visited by millions every year, was closed until further notice. Meanwhile in Britain, Queen Elizabeth II planned to leave for Windsor Castle for Easter on Thursday, a week earlier than planned, and the palace announced that she would likely remain there after the holiday ends.

March 16, 2020

Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization, said: 

This is the defining global health crisis of our time.

The days, weeks and months ahead will be a test of our resolve, a test of our trust in science, and a test of solidarity.

Crises like this tend to bring out the best and worst in humanity.

Like me, I’m sure you have been touched by the videos of people applauding health workers from their balconies, or the stories of people offering to do grocery shopping for older people in their community.

This amazing spirit of human solidarity must become even more infectious than the virus itself. Although we may have to be physically apart from each other for a while, we can come together in ways we never have before.

We’re all in this together. And we can only succeed together.

So the rule of the game is: together.

Oregon Governor Kate Brown announced new restrictions to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The new orders on social distancing measures, effective March 17 for at least four weeks, included:

  • A statewide cancelation of all events and gatherings larger than 25 people — exempting essential locations like workplaces, grocery stores, pharmacies, and retail stores. It’s additionally recommended that Oregonians avoid gatherings of 10 people or more.
  • Restaurants, bars, and other establishments that offer food or beverages for sale are restricted to carry-out and delivery only with no on-site consumption permitted.
  • Food service at health care facilities, workplaces, and other essential facilities will continue.
  • All other businesses are urged to assess their practices, implement strong social distancing measures, and close their doors temporarily if they cannot put the new guidance in place.

Click here to read the news release

March 15, 2020

Oregon had a total of 39 people diagnosed with COVID-19. The Oregon Health Authority announced three new cases of the novel coronavirus.

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March 14, 2020

A 70-year-old man in Multnomah County is the first person to die from COVID-19 in Oregon. The Multnomah County resident was hospitalized at the Portland Veterans’ Affairs Medical Center and succumbed to his symptoms.

Click here to read the news release

Oregon had a total of 36 people who were diagnosed with COVID-19, after the Oregon Health Authority announced six new presumptive positive cases of the novel coronavirus.

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March 13, 2020

More than 132,000 cases of COVID-19 have been reported to WHO, from 123 countries and territories. 5,000 people have lost their lives. Europe became the epicenter of the pandemic, with more reported cases and deaths than the rest of the world combined, apart from China. More cases are now being reported every day than were reported in China at the height of its epidemic.

March 12, 2020

In consideration of staffing challenges and health concerns due to the public health threat of coronavirus, Governor Kate Brown announced a statewide closure of Oregon K-12 schools from Monday, March 16, through Tuesday, March 31.

Click here to read the news release

Governor Kate Brown set new rules to slow the spread of COVID-19 in Oregon. She issued Executive Order 20-05 which outlines rules addressing large gatherings and social distancing. Governor Brown also issued guidelines for workplaces, schools, care facilities, and other community-wide mitigation efforts to help protect vulnerable and high-risk Oregonians and to protect the state’s health care system capacity.

Click here to read the news release

Almost 125,000 cases have been reported to WHO, from 118 countries and territories. In the past two weeks, the number of cases reported outside China has increased almost 13-fold, and the number of affected countries has almost tripled. There are still 77 countries and territories with no reported cases, and 55 countries and territories that have reported 10 cases or less.

Six additional residents of Oregon Veterans’ Home in Lebanon, where two people were diagnosed with COVID-19, tested positive for COVID-19 and are presumptive positive cases, Oregon Heath Authority announced.

Click here to read the news release

Earlier in the day, Oregon added three new presumptive positive cases to its count of people diagnosed with novel coronavirus, COVID-19, bringing the state’s total to 24.

Clackamas County had its first case, a man between the ages of 35 and 54 who was a close contact with a previous case. The new Washington County cases are both women older than 55 who had no known close contacts with confirmed cases and are considered community-spread cases.

Washington County now has a total of 10 cases.

Click here to read the news release

March 11, 2020

Governor Kate Brown announced urgent new rules to slow the spread of COVID-19 in Oregon. The measures are based on the recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Oregon public health experts, epidemiologists, and health professionals.

Click here to read the news release

The number of affected countries has tripled. There were more than 118,000 cases in 114 countries, and 4,291 people have lost their lives. 

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) announced Linn County’s first two presumptive positive cases of COVID-19. The new cases, involving two males over the age of 80, brings Oregon’s total to 21 total cases in eight counties.

Click here to read the news release

Earlier in the day, Oregon had a total of 19 people who had been diagnosed with COVID-19 since Feb. 28 after the Oregon Health Authority announced four new presumptive positive cases of the novel coronavirus.

OHA confirmed one new case each in Polk, Marion, Umatilla and Deschutes counties. None of the new cases involved travel to a country where the virus is actively spreading. The Polk, Marion and Deschutes cases had no known close contacts with confirmed cases, so they are considered community-spread. The Umatilla County case is a close contact with that county’s first case.

Click here to read the news release

March 9, 2020

Over the weekend there were 100,000 reported cases of COVID-19 in 100 countries. Of the 80,000 reported cases in China, more than 70% have recovered and been discharged. Of all the cases reported globally so far, 93% are from just four countries.

March 8, 2020

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown declares state of emergency. Cases in the state rise to 14. 

Oregon Health Authority (OHA) confirmed seven new presumptive cases of novel coronavirus, COVID-19. OHA also announced actions it is taking to slow the spread of the virus and protect Oregonians, in response to Gov. Kate Brown’s emergency declaration.

 Click here to read the news release

March 7, 2020

Oregon health officials identified four new presumptive positive cases of COVID-19 among residents in Jackson, Klamath and Washington counties. State and local health officials moved quickly to contact people who may have been in close contact with the individuals who tested as presumptively positive cases. Three of the new cases were travel-related; one was a contact of a known case. The Oregon State Public Health Laboratory tested 42 samples from 22 people on March 6, yielding the 4 presumptive positive cases and 18 negatives.

 Click here to read the news release

The global number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 surpassed 100,000. The World Health Organization (WHO) reminded all countries and communities that the spread of this virus can be significantly slowed or even reversed through the implementation of robust containment and control activities. 

China and other countries are demonstrating that spread of the virus can be slowed and impact reduced through the use of universally applicable actions, such as working across society to identify people who are sick, bringing them to care, following up on contacts, preparing hospitals and clinics to manage a surge in patients, and training health workers.

WHO called on all countries to continue efforts that have been effective in limiting the number of cases and slowing the spread of the virus. 

March 6, 2020

The death toll in the U.S. from the coronavirus outbreak rose to 14, with more than 225 cases confirmed across the country. Pennsylvania announced its first cases. Johns Hopkins University announced that more than 100,000 people were infected worldwide. President Donald Trump signed a $8.3 billion emergency spending package to combat the virus.

The CDC reported 164 total cases in the United States, 11 deaths and 19 states reporting cases.

March 5, 2020

The World Health Organization’s Director-General reported there were a total of 95,265 cases of COVID-19 globally, and 3281 deaths. In the previous 24 hours, China reported 143 cases. Most cases continued to be reported from Hubei province, and 8 provinces had not reported any cases in the previous 14 days. Outside China, 2055 cases were reported in 33 countries. Around 80% of those cases continued to come from just three countries. Encouraging signs were seen from the Republic of Korea. The number of newly-reported cases appeared to be declining, and the cases that were being reported were being identified primarily from known clusters. Although a few countries were reporting large numbers of cases, 115 countries had not reported any cases. 21 countries had reported only one case. 5 countries that had reported cases had not reported new cases in the previous 14 days. 

March 4, 2020

California reported its first COVID-19 fatality.

March 3, 2020

CDC confirms first presumptive case of COVID-19 in Oregon.

There was a total of 92,943 reported cases of COVID-19 globally, and 3,160 deaths. In the previous 24 hours, China reported 120 cases. Most cases continued to be reported from Hubei province. Outside China, 2075 cases were reported in 35 countries. Almost 90% of those cases were from just three countries: Republic of Korea, Italy and Iran.

March 2, 2020

Oregon’s third presumptive case is announced. The third case is an adult Oregon resident from Umatilla County who is hospitalized in Walla Walla, Wash. Preliminary reports indicate the Oregon resident attended a youth basketball game at a gymnasium at Weston Middle School, 205 E. Wallace St. in Weston, Ore., on Saturday, Feb. 29.

Click here to read the news release

Washington state reported four new fatalities.

WHO reported the number of cases in China continued to decline. On March 1, China reported 206 cases of COVID-19 to WHO, the lowest since the 22nd of January. Only 8 cases were reported outside Hubei province. Outside China, a total of 8739 cases of COVID-19 were reported to WHO from 61 countries, with 127 deaths.In the previous 24 hours there were almost 9 times more cases reported outside China than inside China. The epidemics in the Republic of Korea, Italy, Iran and Japan were the greatest concern. A WHO team arrived in Iran to deliver supplies and support the government in the response. Also, a WHO staff member in Iran tested positive for COVID-19. He had mild disease. The Republic of Korea reported more than 4,200 cases and 22 deaths, meaning it has more than half of all cases outside China. However, the cases in the Republic of Korea appeared to be coming mostly from suspected cases from the 5 known clusters, rather than the community. That indicated that surveillance measures were working and Korea’s epidemic can be contained.

March 1, 2020

A 70-year-old man is the second fatality in Washington state. Washington declares a state of emergency.

Oregon announces its second presumptive case, a family member of the individual with the first presumptive case.

Click here to read the news release

US$15 million was released from the UN Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) to help fund global efforts to contain the COVID-19 virus.

February 29, 2020

A Washington state man in his 50s with underlying health conditions, becomes the first COVID-19 fatality on US soil.

Congressman Greg Walden held a press conference in Medford.

Click here to see the press conference

February 28, 2020

Oregon announced its first presumptive case of novel coronavirus, COVID-19. Health officials continue investigating as they urge good hand hygiene, covering coughs and staying home if you are sick.

Click here to read the news release.

February 26, 2020

The Director of the Pan American Health Organization, Carissa F. Etienne, recommended that countries intensify their plans to prepare and respond to COVID-19 given the appearance of cases of new coronavirus disease in the Region of the Americas.

As of 6 a.m. Geneva time, China reported 78,190 cases to WHO, including 2718 deaths. On Feb. 25, only 10 new cases were reported in China outside of Hubei province.

14 countries that have had cases have not reported a case for more than a week, and even more importantly, 9 countries have not reported a case for more than two weeks: Belgium, Cambodia, Finland, India, Nepal, Philippines, the Russian Federation, Sri Lanka and Sweden.

Outside China, there are 2,790 cases in 37 countries, and 44 deaths. On Feb. 25, the number of new cases reported outside China exceeded the number of new cases in China for the first time. The sudden increase of cases in Italy, the Islamic Republic of Iran and the Republic of Korea were concerning. There were cases linked to Iran in Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait and Oman.

February 24, 2020

As of 6 a.m. Geneva time, China reported a total of 77,362 cases of COVID-19 to WHO, including 2618 deaths. In the previous 24 hours, China reported 416 new confirmed cases, and 150 deaths.

The WHO-China joint mission concluded its visit and delivered its report. The team traveled to several different provinces, including Wuhan, and made a range of findings about the transmissibility of the virus, the severity of disease and the impact of the measures taken.

  • They found that the epidemic peaked and plateaued between the 23rd of January and the 2nd of February, and has been declining steadily since then.
  • They found that there has been no significant change in the genetic makeup of the virus.
  • They found that the fatality rate is between 2% and 4% in Wuhan, and 0.7% outside Wuhan.
  • They found that for people with mild disease, recovery time is about two weeks, while people with severe or critical disease recover within three to six weeks.

February 21, 2020

As of 6 a.m. Geneva time, China reported a total of 75,567 cases of COVID-19 to WHO, including 2,239 deaths.

In the previous 24 hours, China reported 892 new confirmed cases, and 118 deaths. The significant decline in new confirmed cases was partly due to another change in the way China reports numbers. The previous week China started reporting clinically-diagnosed cases, in addition to laboratory-confirmed cases. They switched back to reporting only suspected and lab-confirmed cases.

This may indicate that the health system in Wuhan regained the ability to test all suspected cases. As a result, some cases that had been clinically-confirmed were subtracted from the total because they tested negative.

Outside China, there were 1,152 cases in 26 countries, and 8 deaths.

February 20, 2020

As of 6 a.m. Geneva time, China reported 74,675 cases of COVID-19 to WHO, including 2,121 deaths.

The data from China continued to show a decline in new confirmed cases. Outside China, there were 1,076 cases in 26 countries, with a total of seven deaths. In the previous 24 hours, the Islamic Republic of Iran reported five cases, two of which died. This was the first report from Iran.

Of all cases outside China, more than half were among passengers on the Diamond Princess cruise ship. The first passengers had disembarked, providing they have a negative test, no symptoms and no contact with a confirmed case in the previous 14 days.

February 16, 2020

The World Health Organization announced a total of nine confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the Eastern Mediterranean Region.

February 14, 2020 

Egypt announces the first case of the coronavirus, according to a joint statement by Egypt’s Ministry of Health and the WHO. This is the first case reported in Africa.

February 11, 2020 

The WHO names the virus COVID-19. 

February 10, 2020 

Chinese President Xi Jinping inspects efforts to contain the virus. A team of international experts from WHO arrive in China to assist with containing the outbreak.

February 8, 2020 

A 60-year-old US national dies in Wuhan on Feb. 6. The US Embassy in Bejing confirms the death.

February 7, 2020 

Dr. Li Wenliang from Wuhan dies from the coronavirus. Wenliang was targeted by police for trying to sound the alarm on the virus back in December. 

February 2, 2020 

A man from the Philippines dies from the coronavirus. This is the first death reported outside of mainland China since the outbreak began.

January 31, 2020 

The Trump administration announces that they will deny entry to foreign nationals who have been to China in the last two weeks.

January 30, 2020 

First case of person-to-person transmission of the virus in the US is reported.

January 21, 2020 

Washington state officials confirm the first case on US soil. 

January 20, 2020

139 new cases come up according to China officials, a third death is reported. The National Institutes of Health announce that they are working on a vaccine against the coronavirus.

January 17, 2020

A second person in China dies from the virus. The United States responds to the outbreak by implementing screenings for symptoms in San Francisco, New York and Los Angeles.

January 16, 2020

Japanese authorities confirm that a Japanese man who traveled to Wuhan is infected with the virus.

January 11, 2020

The first death is announced by the Wuhan Municipal Health Commission. A 61-year-old man died on Jan. 9 due to respiratory failure caused by severe pneumonia. The man was exposed to the virus at the seafood market.

January 7, 2020

The virus is identified as a novel (or new) coronavirus by Chinese authorities. 

January 1, 2020 

The Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market is closed by Chinese health authorities. It’s discovered that wild animals sold there could be the source of the virus.

December 31, 2019

The virus is unknown at this point. Reports of pneumonia detected in Wuhan, China are sent to the World Health Organization. Wuhan Municipal Health says these cases occur between Dec. 12 and Dec. 29.