COVID-19 chronology

logo with verbiage

Compiled from online, newspaper and World Health Organization reports

April 9, 2020

Klamath County reported one new case, bringing the total to 23, with 14 active cases and 9 recoveries.

COVID-19 claimed six more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 44. Oregon Health Authority also reported 83 new cases, bringing the state total to 1,321. The new COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Clackamas (6), Columbia (1), Curry (1), Deschutes (5), Jackson (4), Klamath (1), Lane (2), Linn (3), Marion (17), Morrow (2), Multnomah (16), Polk (1), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (3), Washington (16), and Yamhill (4).

A previously reported Wallowa County case was identified as a Washington State resident, reducing the Wallowa County case total and the statewide case count by 1.

Oregon’s 39th death was a 74-year-old man in Linn County, who tested positive on March 22 and died on April 3 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 40th death was a 97-year-old man in Linn County, who tested positive on March 15 and died on April 4 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 41st death was an 87-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 28 and died on April 6 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 42nd death was a 41-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 5 and died on April 8 at Oregon Health and Sciences University. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 43rd death was a 66-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 31 and died on April 5 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 44th death was a 74-year-old man in Benton County, who tested positive on March 26 and died on April 8 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center in Corvallis. He had underlying medical conditions.

At 2:30 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time, the United States had 462,180 cases, with 26,589 recoveries and 16,444 deaths. Worldwide there were 1,593,137 cases, with 355,561 recoveries and 95,026 deaths. 

April 8, 2020

COVID-19  claimed five more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 38.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 58 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 1,239. The new cases reported were in the following counties: Clackamas (6), Columbia (1), Deschutes (1), Hood River (1), Lane (1), Linn (1), Marion (3), Morrow (1), Multnomah (28), Wallowa (2), and Washington (13). To see more case and county-level data, 

Oregon’s 34th COVID-19 death was an 88-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 28 and died on April 6 at OHSU Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 35th death was a 77-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 27 and died April 1 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 36th death was a 75-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 6 and died April 7 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 37th death was a 94-year-old man in Yamhill County, who tested positive on March 25 and died April 7 at Providence Newberg Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 38th death was a 90-year-old man in Yamhill County, who tested positive on March 25 and died April 7 at Providence Newberg Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

At 5 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time the United States had 432,244 cases, with 25,722 recoveries and 14,722 deaths. Worldwide the case count was 1,516,800, with 338,369 recoveries and 88,386 deaths.   

April 7, 2020

Klamath County had one new COVID-19 case, bringing the total to 22. COVID-19 claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 33.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 49 new cases, bringing the state total to 1,181. The new COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Clackamas (7), Clatsop (1), Deschutes (4), Klamath (1), Lane (1), Linn (1), Marion (6), Multnomah (15), Polk (2), Washington (11). 

Oregon’s 30th death was an 83-year-old female in Marion County, who tested positive on March 28 and died on April 5 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 31st death was a 98-year-old female in Marion County, who tested positive on April 1 and died April 5 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 32nd death was a 71-year-old female in Marion County, who tested positive on March 30 and died April 2 in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 33rd death was a 91-year-old female in Washington County, who tested positive on March 27 and died April 6 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

At 3 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time there were 396,223 cases in the United States, with 20,328 recoveries and 12,716 deaths. Worldwide there were 1,427,089 cases, with 303,385 recoveries and 81,859 deaths.

April 6, 2020

Klamath County reported six more cases of COVID-19, bringing the count to 21. The county announced cases as laboratory results are available, which is often a different number than reported by the Oregon Health Authority.

COVID-19 claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 29. Oregon Health Authority also reported 64 new cases of COVID-19. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (6), Columbia (2), Curry (2), Deschutes (1), Douglas (1), Jackson (6), Josephine (3), Klamath (3), Lane (2), Linn (1), Marion (11), Multnomah (10), Polk (2), Umatilla (1), Washington (12).

Oregon’s 28th COVID-19 death was a 93-year-old male in Washington County, who tested positive on March 30 and died April 4, at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 29th COVID-19 death was a 70-year-old female in Marion county, who tested positive on April 1 and died April 2, at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

At 11 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time the United States had 356,007 cases, with 15,921 recoveries and 10,467 deaths. Worldwide there were 1,329,574 cases, with 274,804 recoveries and 73,758 deaths.

April 5, 2020

Klamath County reported its fifteenth case of COVID-19. One individual locally had recovered from the virus to date.

COVID-19 claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 26 to 27. Oregon Health Authority also reported 69 new cases in the following counties: Clackamas (6), Columbia (3), Klamath (1), Lane (3), Linn (2), Marion (10), Multnomah (24), Polk (2), Sherman (1), Umatilla (2), Washington (12), Yamhill (3). .

Oregon’s 27th COVID-19 death was a 62-year-old female in Multnomah County, who tested positive and died on April 2 at her residence. It is unknown if she had underlying medical conditions.

At 18:33 Greenwich Mean Time, the United States had 328,662 cases, with 16,700 recoveries and 9,361 deaths. At 11:30 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time, there were 1,254,288 worldwide cases, with 255,675 recoveries and 68,150 deaths.

April 4, 2020

COVID-19 claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 22 to 26.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 100 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the statewide total to 999. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (12), Columbia (2), Deschutes (3), Douglas (2), Jackson (6), Josephine (1), Klamath (1) [reported April 3], Lane (3), Linn (3), Marion (10), Multnomah (34), Polk (2), and Washington (19). 

Oregon’s 23rd COVID-19 death was a 65-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on March 26 and died on April 2 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 24th COVID-19 death was a 59-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 24 and died on April 3 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 25th COVID-19 death was a 77-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 30 and died on April 2 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 26th COVID-19 death was a 64-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 23 and died on April 1 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

At 5 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time there were 1,200,876 cases worldwide with 248,022 recoveries and 64,955 deaths. At 23:42 Greenwich Mean Time there were 310,133 cases in the United States with 14,741 recoveries and 8,442 deaths.

April 3, 2020

Klamath County reported two new cases.

COVID-19 claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 22.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 73 new cases of COVID-19. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (5), Clatsop (1), Crook (1), Deschutes (4), Klamath (5) [some of these were reported April 2], Malheur (1), Marion (14), Morrow (1), Multnomah (15), Polk (2), Washington (17), Yamhill (5). 

Oregon’s 22nd COVID-19 death was a 71-year-old man in Polk County, who tested positive on March 19 and died April 2 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Worldwide there were 1,116,662 cases with 228,589 recoveries and 59,174 deaths. There were 277,161 cases in the United States with 7,404 deaths.

April 2, 2020

Klamath County Public Health announced seven new cases of COVID-19 in the county. The county’s total cases number 12, with one recovery and 11 active cases. The statewide total was 826. Overall, 16,085 have been tested.

COVID-19 claimed 2 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 19 to 21.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 90 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the statewide total to 826. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (5), Deschutes (5), Hood River (1), Jackson (5), Josephine (2), Klamath (3) [the county announced 7 new cases above, as lab results became available], Lane (3), Lincoln (1), Marion (13), Union (2), Multnomah (26), Washington (22), and Yamhill (1). 

Oregon’s twentieth COVID-19 death was a 61-year-old man in Washington County, who tested positive on March 21 and died on April 1 at Tuality Healthcare. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s twenty-first COVID-19 death was a 91-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on March 31 and died on April 1 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

At noon Pacific Daylight Time, the global count was 1,008,038 cases, 206,870 recoveries and 52,486 deaths. At 20:51 Greenwich Mean Time, the United States had 240,395 total cases, with 10,365 recoveries and 5,808 deaths. 

April 1, 2020

COVID-19 claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 19. Oregon Health Authority also reported 47 new cases of COVID-19. The new COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (6), Deschutes (3), Douglas (1), Jackson (1), Lane (2), Lincoln (1), Marion (10), Multnomah (18), Washington (3), and Yamhill (1). One case previously reported in Hood River County was identified as a resident of another state; thus, today’s statewide case count is 736. 

Oregon’s nineteenth COVID-19 death was a 70-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 27 and died on March 29 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

At 21:42 Greenwich Mean Time the United States had 211,408 cases, 8,805 recoveries and 4,718 deaths. At 9 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time there were globally 891,487 cases, 185,942 recoveries and 44,232 deaths.

The Director-General of the World Health Organization said: 

"This is still a very new virus, and we are learning all the time.

"As the pandemic evolves, so does the evidence, and so does our advice.

"But what doesn’t change is WHO’s commitment to protecting the health of all people, based on the best science, without fear or favour.

"I thank you."

March 31, 2020

COVID-19 claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 16 to 18. Oregon Health Authority also reported 84 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 690. The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (10), Douglas (1), Hood River (1), Jackson (1), Klamath (1) [reported locally March 30], Lane (4), Lincoln (1), Linn (1), Malheur (1), Marion (18), Multnomah (16), Polk (3), Umatilla (1), Wallowa (1), Wasco (2), Washington (18), and Yamhill (2). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s seventeenth COVID-19 death was a 90-year-old man in Yamhill County, who tested positive on March 25 and died on March 29 at Providence Newberg Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s eighteenth COVID-19 death was an 88-year-old woman in Benton County, who tested positive on March 26 and died March 30 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center in Corvallis. She had underlying medical conditions.

At 10 a.m. Pacific Daylight time the global count was 722,924 cases, 156,383 recoveries and 33,867 deaths.

At 17:18 Greenwich Mean Time there were 12,730 new cases and 290 new deaths in the United States.

March 30, 2020

Klamath County reported its fifth case. It was thought to be from spread in the community.

COVID-19 claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 16. Oregon Health Authority reported 58 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 606. The new COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (1), Deschutes (2), Douglas (4), Jackson (1), Josephine (4), Lane (2), Marion (14), Multnomah (9), Polk (2), Tillamook (1), Wasco (2), Washington (14), Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 14th COVID-19 death was a 91-year-old male in Yamhill County, who tested positive on March 20, and died March 29 at Providence Newberg Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 15th COVID-19 death was an 80-year-old male in Clackamas County, who tested positive on March 22, and died March 29 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 16th COVID-19 death was a 91-year-old male in Linn County, who tested positive on March 15, and died March 29 at the Oregon Veterans’ Home in Lebanon. He had underlying medical conditions.

There were 20,297 new cases and 558 new deaths in the United States.

At 11 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time globally there were 764,062 cases, 164,813 recoveries and 36,956 deaths.

World Health Organization Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said:

"Yesterday I sent a tweet with a single word: humility. Some people asked me why.

"COVID-19 is reminding us how vulnerable we are, how connected we are and how dependent we are on each other.

"In the eye of a storm like COVID, scientific and public health tools are essential, but so are humility and kindness.

"With solidarity, humility and assuming the best of each other, we can – and will – overcome this together.

"I thank you."

March 29, 2020

Oregon Health Authority reported 69 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 548. No new deaths were reported.  The new COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Clackamas (3), Deschutes (3), Hood River (1), Jackson (11), Josephine (1), Klamath (2) [Klamath County reported its cases on March 28, when the test results became available], Lane (1), Linn (4), Marion (15), Multnomah (10), Polk (2), Tillamook (1), Wasco (1), Washington (14). 

The 93-year-old man whose death was reported March 28 had an underlying condition. 

There were 19,913 new cases and 363 new deaths in the United States.

Global numbers at 2:30 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time were 722,924 cases, 156,383 recoveries and 33,867 deaths.

March 28, 2020

Klamath County reported two new cases of COVID-19. One was possibly the first community-spread case in the area.

COVID-19 claimed another life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 12 to 13. Oregon Health Authority also reported 65 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 479. The COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (5), Clatsop (1), Deschutes (2), Jackson (2), Josephine (1), Linn (4), Marion (11), Multnomah (14), Polk (1), Umatilla (1), Washington (18), Yamhill (2).

Oregon’s 13th COVID-19 death was a 93-year-old male in Yamhill County, who tested positive on March 18, and died March 27 at Providence Newberg Medical Center. He had no known underlying medical conditions.

There were 19,452 new cases and 525 new deaths in the United States.

At 10:30 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time the global county was 644,417 cases, 143,496 recoveries and 29,905 deaths.

March 27, 2020

COVID-19 claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 12.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 98 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 414. The COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Clackamas (10), Columbia (1), Deschutes (3), Douglas (1), Jackson (2), Klamath (1), Lane (2), Linn (2), Marion (26), Morrow (1), Multnomah (22), Polk (4), Umatilla (1), Wasco (1), Washington (18), Yamhill (4). 

Oregon’s twelfth COVID-19 death was an 82-year-old woman in Marion County. She tested positive on March 20, and died March 25 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

There were 18,691 new cases and 400 new deaths in the United States. 

At 1:30 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time global numbers included 581,738 cases, 130,887 recoveries and 26,773 deaths.

March 26, 2020

Klamath County had its second confirmed case of COVID-19. It was announced ahead of its recording in the Oregon Health Authority’s daily report, as it was confirmed after the daily numbers were tallied at 8 a.m.

COVID-19 claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 10 to 11, the Oregon Health Authority reported.

OHA also reported 50 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 316. The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clatsop (1), Deschutes (5), Josephine (2), Lane (2), Linn (1), Marion (14), Multnomah (12), Polk (3), Tillamook (1), Wasco (1), and Washington (8). 

Oregon’s eleventh COVID-19 death was a 69-year-old woman in Washington County, who tested positive on March 15, and died March 25 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

There were 17,224 new cases and 268 new deaths in the United States.

At 3:30 p.m. Pacific Standard Time the global case count was 529,029 with 119,859 recoveries and 23,967 deaths.

March 25, 2020

COVID-19 claimed 2 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 8 to 10. Oregon Health Authority also reported 57 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 266. The COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (4), Douglas (2), Jackson (1), Josephine (1), Lane (1), Lincoln (1), Linn (5), Marion (11), Multnomah (8), Washington (20), Yamhill (1). 

Oregon’s ninth COVID-19 death was an 80-year-old woman in Clackamas County, who tested positive on March 23, and died March 24 at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s tenth COVID-19 death was a 73-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on March 22, and died March 23 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

There were 13,355 new cases and 247 new deaths in the United States. Total cases top 60,000.

March 24, 2020

COVID-19 claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to eight. Oregon Health Authority also reported 18 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 209. The COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Clackamas (3), Clatsop (1), Jackson (1), Marion (2), Multnomah (4), and Washington (7).

Oregon’s sixth COVID-19 death was a 78-year-old man in Clackamas County, who tested positive on March 15, and died March 22 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s seventh COVID-19 death was a 63-year-old man in Multnomah County, who had underlying medical conditions and was not hospitalized at the time of death. He tested positive on March 16, and died March 23.

Oregon’s eighth COVID-19 death was a 90-year-old woman in Washington County, who tested positive on March 19, and died March 23 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

There were 11,075 new cases and 225 new deaths in the United States.

At 1 p.m.Pacific Daylight Time the global count was 416,248 confirmed cases, 18,652 deaths and 105,224 recoveries. 

March 23, 2020

Oregon Health Authority reported 30 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 191. The COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Clackamas (2), Hood River (1), Linn (1), Marion (8), Multnomah (2), Polk (2), Washington (14).

There were 10,189 new cases and 141 new deaths in the United States.

More than 300,000 cases of COVID-19 were reported to WHO, from almost every country in the world. The pandemic was accelerating. It took 67 days from the first reported case to reach the first 100,000 cases, 11 days for the second 100,000 cases and just 4 days for the third 100,000 cases. 

The 2 p.m. total for confirmed cases was 303,632, with 13,025 deaths and 93,615 recoveries. The other cases were still fighting the virus.

March 22, 2020

COVID-19 claimed another life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from four to five. The Oregon Health Authority also reported 24 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 161.

The COVID-19 cases reported were in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (1), Deschutes (1), Lane (1), Marion (3), Multnomah (1), Washington (13) and Yamhill (2).

Oregon’s one COVID-19 death in Linn County was a veteran in his 90’s, who tested positive on March 11, and died March 23 at the Oregon Veterans Home. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon Health Authority and other officials also announced details about $4 million in state funding that is going out to Local Public Health Authorities (LPHA), Tribes and Native American Rehabilitation Association (NARA – the Urban Indian Health Program in Oregon) to support COVID-19 response. 

There were 9,400 new cases and 113 new deaths in the United States.

March 21, 2020

COVID-19 claimed another life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from three to four, the Oregon Health Authority reported. Oregon Health Authority also reported 23 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 137.

Oregon’s fourth COVID-19 death was a 72-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on March 15, and died March 20 at Kaiser Permanente Sunnyside Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

There were 4825 new cases and 46 new deaths in the United States. 

At 1:30 Pacific Daylight Time, there were 303,632 cases reported worldwide, resulting in 13,052 deaths and 93,615 recoveries. The balance of cases were still exhibiting symptoms.

March 20, 2020

The Oregon Health Authority, together with the Oregon Military Department, is assembed the Oregon Medical Station (OMS) at the Salem Fairgrounds. The OMS is a temporary mobile facility dedicated for emergency use in situations like the COVID-19 pandemic. The mobile facility will provide an alternate site for 250 patients currently in nursing home care.

There were 5,588 new cases and 49 new deaths in the United States. 23% of the US population is ordered to "stay at home" after governors in California (40 million residents), New York State (20 million), Illinois (13 million), and Connecticut (3.5 million) ordered nonessential workers to remain at home to slow the spread of coronavirus.

March 19, 2020

Oregon has 88 confirmed cases of COVID-19. 

There were 4,582 new cases and 56 new deaths in the United States.

March 18, 2020

Oregon Governor Kate Brown issued two new executive orders. One to preserve personal protective equipment by limiting use and another regarding institutions of higher education.

Click here to read the protective equipment news release

Click here to read the high education news release

There were 2,853 new cases and 40 new deaths in the United States. 

More than 200,000 cases of COVID-19 have been reported to the World Health Organization, and more than 8,000 people have lost their lives. More than 80% of all cases are from two regions – the Western Pacific and Europe.

These countries had more than 1,000 cases at noon:

  • China: 81,151 cases
  • Italy: 31,506 cases
  • Iran (Islamic Republic of): 16,169 cases
  • Spain: 11,178 cases
  • Republic of Korea: 8,413 cases
  • France: 7,652 cases
  • Germany: 7,156 cases
  • United States of America: 4,356 cases
  • Switzerland: 2,650 cases
  • The United Kingdom: 1,954 cases
  • Netherlands: 1,705 cases
  • Belgium: 1,486 cases
  • Austria: 1,471 cases
  • Norway: 1,423 cases
  • Sweden: 1,167 cases
  • Denmark: 1,044 cases

March 17, 2020

The Klamath County Board of Commissioners declared a state of emergency.

Click here to read the declaration

Oregon Governor Kate Brown extends her order for school closure to April 28.

Click here to read the news release

Statement to the press by Dr Hans Henri P. Kluge, WHO Regional Director for Europe

Copenhagen, Denmark, 17 March 2020

Ladies and gentlemen, we are holding this press briefing in an empty UN City building while staff work remotely as a social distancing measure in response to COVID-19.

The lives of millions of people in the WHO European Region are undergoing radical change. This is, quite simply, a new reality. The role of public health services is understood. The value of health workers is appreciated like never before.

Click here to read: Every country needs to take boldest actions to stop COVID-19

The popular St. Patrick’s Day parades in New York City and Boston were canceled — as they were in Dublin, where people were encouraged to celebrate the day online using the hashtag #StPatricksDayTogether. Many bars and pubs around the United States were closed before the holiday, shutting them down on what is traditionally one of their busiest days of the year.

Bus service in Detroit was halted after drivers, fearing for their safety, balked at leaving their garages. In North Carolina’s Outer Banks, some officials said they would establish checkpoints to turn away visitors. And Florida moved to ban beach groups of more than 10, after photos showed packed Gulf Coast beaches this week during Spring Break.

In France, the sanctuary in Lourdes, a major Catholic pilgrimage site that is visited by millions every year, was closed until further notice. Meanwhile in Britain, Queen Elizabeth II planned to leave for Windsor Castle for Easter on Thursday, a week earlier than planned, and the palace announced that she would likely remain there after the holiday ends.

March 16, 2020

Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization, said: 

This is the defining global health crisis of our time.

The days, weeks and months ahead will be a test of our resolve, a test of our trust in science, and a test of solidarity.

Crises like this tend to bring out the best and worst in humanity.

Like me, I’m sure you have been touched by the videos of people applauding health workers from their balconies, or the stories of people offering to do grocery shopping for older people in their community.

This amazing spirit of human solidarity must become even more infectious than the virus itself. Although we may have to be physically apart from each other for a while, we can come together in ways we never have before.

We’re all in this together. And we can only succeed together.

So the rule of the game is: together.

Oregon Governor Kate Brown announced new restrictions to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The new orders on social distancing measures, effective March 17 for at least four weeks, included:

  • A statewide cancelation of all events and gatherings larger than 25 people — exempting essential locations like workplaces, grocery stores, pharmacies, and retail stores. It’s additionally recommended that Oregonians avoid gatherings of 10 people or more.
  • Restaurants, bars, and other establishments that offer food or beverages for sale are restricted to carry-out and delivery only with no on-site consumption permitted.
  • Food service at health care facilities, workplaces, and other essential facilities will continue.
  • All other businesses are urged to assess their practices, implement strong social distancing measures, and close their doors temporarily if they cannot put the new guidance in place.

Click here to read the news release

March 15, 2020

Oregon had a total of 39 people diagnosed with COVID-19. The Oregon Health Authority announced three new cases of the novel coronavirus.

Click here to read the news release

March 14, 2020

A 70-year-old man in Multnomah County is the first person to die from COVID-19 in Oregon. The Multnomah County resident was hospitalized at the Portland Veterans’ Affairs Medical Center and succumbed to his symptoms.

Click here to read the news release

Oregon had a total of 36 people who were diagnosed with COVID-19, after the Oregon Health Authority announced six new presumptive positive cases of the novel coronavirus.

Click here to read the news release

March 13, 2020

More than 132,000 cases of COVID-19 have been reported to WHO, from 123 countries and territories. 5,000 people have lost their lives. Europe became the epicenter of the pandemic, with more reported cases and deaths than the rest of the world combined, apart from China. More cases are now being reported every day than were reported in China at the height of its epidemic.

March 12, 2020

In consideration of staffing challenges and health concerns due to the public health threat of coronavirus, Governor Kate Brown announced a statewide closure of Oregon K-12 schools from Monday, March 16, through Tuesday, March 31.

Click here to read the news release

Governor Kate Brown set new rules to slow the spread of COVID-19 in Oregon. She issued Executive Order 20-05 which outlines rules addressing large gatherings and social distancing. Governor Brown also issued guidelines for workplaces, schools, care facilities, and other community-wide mitigation efforts to help protect vulnerable and high-risk Oregonians and to protect the state’s health care system capacity.

Click here to read the news release

Almost 125,000 cases have been reported to WHO, from 118 countries and territories. In the past two weeks, the number of cases reported outside China has increased almost 13-fold, and the number of affected countries has almost tripled. There are still 77 countries and territories with no reported cases, and 55 countries and territories that have reported 10 cases or less.

Six additional residents of Oregon Veterans’ Home in Lebanon, where two people were diagnosed with COVID-19, tested positive for COVID-19 and are presumptive positive cases, Oregon Heath Authority announced.

Click here to read the news release

Earlier in the day, Oregon added three new presumptive positive cases to its count of people diagnosed with novel coronavirus, COVID-19, bringing the state’s total to 24.

Clackamas County had its first case, a man between the ages of 35 and 54 who was a close contact with a previous case. The new Washington County cases are both women older than 55 who had no known close contacts with confirmed cases and are considered community-spread cases.

Washington County now has a total of 10 cases.

Click here to read the news release

March 11, 2020

Governor Kate Brown announced urgent new rules to slow the spread of COVID-19 in Oregon. The measures are based on the recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Oregon public health experts, epidemiologists, and health professionals.

Click here to read the news release

The number of affected countries has tripled. There were more than 118,000 cases in 114 countries, and 4,291 people have lost their lives. 

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) announced Linn County’s first two presumptive positive cases of COVID-19. The new cases, involving two males over the age of 80, brings Oregon’s total to 21 total cases in eight counties.

Click here to read the news release

Earlier in the day, Oregon had a total of 19 people who had been diagnosed with COVID-19 since Feb. 28 after the Oregon Health Authority announced four new presumptive positive cases of the novel coronavirus.

OHA confirmed one new case each in Polk, Marion, Umatilla and Deschutes counties. None of the new cases involved travel to a country where the virus is actively spreading. The Polk, Marion and Deschutes cases had no known close contacts with confirmed cases, so they are considered community-spread. The Umatilla County case is a close contact with that county’s first case.

Click here to read the news release

March 9, 2020

Over the weekend there were 100,000 reported cases of COVID-19 in 100 countries. Of the 80,000 reported cases in China, more than 70% have recovered and been discharged. Of all the cases reported globally so far, 93% are from just four countries.

March 8, 2020

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown declares state of emergency. Cases in the state rise to 14. 

Oregon Health Authority (OHA) confirmed seven new presumptive cases of novel coronavirus, COVID-19. OHA also announced actions it is taking to slow the spread of the virus and protect Oregonians, in response to Gov. Kate Brown’s emergency declaration.

 Click here to read the news release

March 7, 2020

Oregon health officials identified four new presumptive positive cases of COVID-19 among residents in Jackson, Klamath and Washington counties. State and local health officials moved quickly to contact people who may have been in close contact with the individuals who tested as presumptively positive cases. Three of the new cases were travel-related; one was a contact of a known case. The Oregon State Public Health Laboratory tested 42 samples from 22 people on March 6, yielding the 4 presumptive positive cases and 18 negatives.

 Click here to read the news release

The global number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 surpassed 100,000. The World Health Organization (WHO) reminded all countries and communities that the spread of this virus can be significantly slowed or even reversed through the implementation of robust containment and control activities. 

China and other countries are demonstrating that spread of the virus can be slowed and impact reduced through the use of universally applicable actions, such as working across society to identify people who are sick, bringing them to care, following up on contacts, preparing hospitals and clinics to manage a surge in patients, and training health workers.

WHO called on all countries to continue efforts that have been effective in limiting the number of cases and slowing the spread of the virus. 

March 6, 2020

The death toll in the U.S. from the coronavirus outbreak rose to 14, with more than 225 cases confirmed across the country. Pennsylvania announced its first cases. Johns Hopkins University announced that more than 100,000 people were infected worldwide. President Donald Trump signed a $8.3 billion emergency spending package to combat the virus.

The CDC reported 164 total cases in the United States, 11 deaths and 19 states reporting cases.

March 5, 2020

The World Health Organization’s Director-General reported there were a total of 95,265 cases of COVID-19 globally, and 3281 deaths. In the previous 24 hours, China reported 143 cases. Most cases continued to be reported from Hubei province, and 8 provinces had not reported any cases in the previous 14 days. Outside China, 2055 cases were reported in 33 countries. Around 80% of those cases continued to come from just three countries. Encouraging signs were seen from the Republic of Korea. The number of newly-reported cases appeared to be declining, and the cases that were being reported were being identified primarily from known clusters. Although a few countries were reporting large numbers of cases, 115 countries had not reported any cases. 21 countries had reported only one case. 5 countries that had reported cases had not reported new cases in the previous 14 days. 

March 4, 2020

California reported its first COVID-19 fatality.

March 3, 2020

CDC confirms first presumptive case of COVID-19 in Oregon.

There was a total of 92,943 reported cases of COVID-19 globally, and 3,160 deaths. In the previous 24 hours, China reported 120 cases. Most cases continued to be reported from Hubei province. Outside China, 2075 cases were reported in 35 countries. Almost 90% of those cases were from just three countries: Republic of Korea, Italy and Iran.

March 2, 2020

Oregon’s third presumptive case is announced. The third case is an adult Oregon resident from Umatilla County who is hospitalized in Walla Walla, Wash. Preliminary reports indicate the Oregon resident attended a youth basketball game at a gymnasium at Weston Middle School, 205 E. Wallace St. in Weston, Ore., on Saturday, Feb. 29.

Click here to read the news release

Washington state reported four new fatalities.

WHO reported the number of cases in China continued to decline. On March 1, China reported 206 cases of COVID-19 to WHO, the lowest since the 22nd of January. Only 8 cases were reported outside Hubei province. Outside China, a total of 8739 cases of COVID-19 were reported to WHO from 61 countries, with 127 deaths.In the previous 24 hours there were almost 9 times more cases reported outside China than inside China. The epidemics in the Republic of Korea, Italy, Iran and Japan were the greatest concern. A WHO team arrived in Iran to deliver supplies and support the government in the response. Also, a WHO staff member in Iran tested positive for COVID-19. He had mild disease. The Republic of Korea reported more than 4,200 cases and 22 deaths, meaning it has more than half of all cases outside China. However, the cases in the Republic of Korea appeared to be coming mostly from suspected cases from the 5 known clusters, rather than the community. That indicated that surveillance measures were working and Korea’s epidemic can be contained.

March 1, 2020

A 70-year-old man is the second fatality in Washington state. Washington declares a state of emergency.

Oregon announces its second presumptive case, a family member of the individual with the first presumptive case.

Click here to read the news release

US$15 million was released from the UN Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) to help fund global efforts to contain the COVID-19 virus.

February 29, 2020

A Washington state man in his 50s with underlying health conditions, becomes the first COVID-19 fatality on US soil.

Congressman Greg Walden held a press conference in Medford.

Click here to see the press conference

February 28, 2020

Oregon announced its first presumptive case of novel coronavirus, COVID-19. Health officials continue investigating as they urge good hand hygiene, covering coughs and staying home if you are sick.

Click here to read the news release.

February 26, 2020

The Director of the Pan American Health Organization, Carissa F. Etienne, recommended that countries intensify their plans to prepare and respond to COVID-19 given the appearance of cases of new coronavirus disease in the Region of the Americas.

As of 6 a.m. Geneva time, China reported 78,190 cases to WHO, including 2718 deaths. On Feb. 25, only 10 new cases were reported in China outside of Hubei province.

14 countries that have had cases have not reported a case for more than a week, and even more importantly, 9 countries have not reported a case for more than two weeks: Belgium, Cambodia, Finland, India, Nepal, Philippines, the Russian Federation, Sri Lanka and Sweden.

Outside China, there are 2,790 cases in 37 countries, and 44 deaths. On Feb. 25, the number of new cases reported outside China exceeded the number of new cases in China for the first time. The sudden increase of cases in Italy, the Islamic Republic of Iran and the Republic of Korea were concerning. There were cases linked to Iran in Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait and Oman.

February 24, 2020

As of 6 a.m. Geneva time, China reported a total of 77,362 cases of COVID-19 to WHO, including 2618 deaths. In the previous 24 hours, China reported 416 new confirmed cases, and 150 deaths.

The WHO-China joint mission concluded its visit and delivered its report. The team traveled to several different provinces, including Wuhan, and made a range of findings about the transmissibility of the virus, the severity of disease and the impact of the measures taken.

  • They found that the epidemic peaked and plateaued between the 23rd of January and the 2nd of February, and has been declining steadily since then.
  • They found that there has been no significant change in the genetic makeup of the virus.
  • They found that the fatality rate is between 2% and 4% in Wuhan, and 0.7% outside Wuhan.
  • They found that for people with mild disease, recovery time is about two weeks, while people with severe or critical disease recover within three to six weeks.

February 21, 2020

As of 6 a.m. Geneva time, China reported a total of 75,567 cases of COVID-19 to WHO, including 2,239 deaths.

In the previous 24 hours, China reported 892 new confirmed cases, and 118 deaths. The significant decline in new confirmed cases was partly due to another change in the way China reports numbers. The previous week China started reporting clinically-diagnosed cases, in addition to laboratory-confirmed cases. They switched back to reporting only suspected and lab-confirmed cases.

This may indicate that the health system in Wuhan regained the ability to test all suspected cases. As a result, some cases that had been clinically-confirmed were subtracted from the total because they tested negative.

Outside China, there were 1,152 cases in 26 countries, and 8 deaths.

February 20, 2020

As of 6 a.m. Geneva time, China reported 74,675 cases of COVID-19 to WHO, including 2,121 deaths.

The data from China continued to show a decline in new confirmed cases. Outside China, there were 1,076 cases in 26 countries, with a total of seven deaths. In the previous 24 hours, the Islamic Republic of Iran reported five cases, two of which died. This was the first report from Iran.

Of all cases outside China, more than half were among passengers on the Diamond Princess cruise ship. The first passengers had disembarked, providing they have a negative test, no symptoms and no contact with a confirmed case in the previous 14 days.

February 16, 2020

The World Health Organization announced a total of nine confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the Eastern Mediterranean Region.

February 14, 2020 

Egypt announces the first case of the coronavirus, according to a joint statement by Egypt’s Ministry of Health and the WHO. This is the first case reported in Africa.

February 11, 2020 

The WHO names the virus COVID-19. 

February 10, 2020 

Chinese President Xi Jinping inspects efforts to contain the virus. A team of international experts from WHO arrive in China to assist with containing the outbreak.

February 8, 2020 

A 60-year-old US national dies in Wuhan on Feb. 6. The US Embassy in Bejing confirms the death.

February 7, 2020 

Dr. Li Wenliang from Wuhan dies from the coronavirus. Wenliang was targeted by police for trying to sound the alarm on the virus back in December. 

February 2, 2020 

A man from the Philippines dies from the coronavirus. This is the first death reported outside of mainland China since the outbreak began.

January 31, 2020 

The Trump administration announces that they will deny entry to foreign nationals who have been to China in the last two weeks.

January 30, 2020 

First case of person-to-person transmission of the virus in the US is reported.

January 21, 2020 

Washington state officials confirm the first case on US soil. 

January 20, 2020

139 new cases come up according to China officials, a third death is reported. The National Institutes of Health announce that they are working on a vaccine against the coronavirus.

January 17, 2020

A second person in China dies from the virus. The United States responds to the outbreak by implementing screenings for symptoms in San Francisco, New York and Los Angeles.

January 16, 2020

Japanese authorities confirm that a Japanese man who traveled to Wuhan is infected with the virus.

January 11, 2020

The first death is announced by the Wuhan Municipal Health Commission. A 61-year-old man died on Jan. 9 due to respiratory failure caused by severe pneumonia. The man was exposed to the virus at the seafood market.

January 7, 2020

The virus is identified as a novel (or new) coronavirus by Chinese authorities. 

January 1, 2020 

The Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market is closed by Chinese health authorities. It’s discovered that wild animals sold there could be the source of the virus.

December 31, 2019

The virus is unknown at this point. Reports of pneumonia detected in Wuhan, China are sent to the World Health Organization. Wuhan Municipal Health says these cases occur between Dec. 12 and Dec. 29.